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View Full Version : Russian players are injured before they turn 20, is the age restriction too soft!?


CJK
Jul 31st, 2004, 07:36 PM
And the Belgians are out due to injuries even in their early 20's.
Nastya was injured early on. There are just too many examples that say AER is too soft on teens.
I think they should start enforcing harder restrictions.

My suggestion
1) raise the age limit for playing. And limiting players to play only after they are 16, and enforce limitations on the number of tournaments they play till after they turn 20.

2) reduce the number of tournaments they can play

3) enforce harder penalty on those who try to break the rules.

4) monitor their healthy more closely.

Hant Hant
Jul 31st, 2004, 07:39 PM
Damn it, I want Jelena and Hant to come back to normal again

CJK
Aug 3rd, 2004, 08:24 PM
A little comment on Dinara and Lina K's injuries.
AER obviously didnt do a good job protecting them. For Lina K, they let her turn pro too early.
In Dinara's case, she played 3 weeks straight going Roland Garros.
It's not acceptable for Dinara who just turned 18 to be actually out since Wimbledon.

DA FOREHAND
Aug 3rd, 2004, 08:32 PM
The players are killing themselves in the name of ranking points, and money. It's up to the parents and the individual players to make a sensible schedule. Choices and consequences.

TheBoiledEgg
Aug 3rd, 2004, 08:38 PM
A little comment on Dinara and Lina K's injuries.
AER obviously didnt do a good job protecting them. For Lina K, they let her turn pro too early.

Lina turned pro in late 1999, not too early
She finished with juniors then, so there was no point playing that as she was #1 and nothing to prove.

what happened to Lina is just :sad:
2002 bad ankle injury......... then the doctor treating her makes it 10 times worse.
last yr she got back playing again but didnt over play as she always as a a few weeks off in between her tourns.
ended season with a shoulder prob, that needed repair and rest.

then she gets ill with a kidney prob

what does the doctor ****ing your ankle up and being ill have to do with AER

and Justine's the same..... being ill has nothing to do with AER.

Dave B
Aug 3rd, 2004, 08:46 PM
The players are killing themselves in the name of ranking points, and money. It's up to the parents and the individual players to make a sensible schedule. Choices and consequences.

So true. Leave it to the players. The WTA shouldn't be held culpable for adults who make decisions that lead to injury. That is why the AER is fine--it only effects people who are not yet adults (by American standards anyway).

Doc
Aug 3rd, 2004, 08:53 PM
Before we start getting too much of a head of steam up on this: Are we sure the spate of player injuries are due to playing too many matches?

I have seen no evidence for this. It is very easy to assume a causal relationship that is not there, and then take hasty actions that make matters worse.

Among the most injury prone players are the Williamses who are notorious for playing a very limited schedule.

Other possible reasons for multiplying injuries include:

*Too short an off-season: Barely six weeks (and that has Hopman Cup and exhibitions)
*Poor player conditioning. Little central research into injury prevention.
*Bad playing surfaces for movement (like the notorious Rebound Ace)
*Players having to move and turn too vigorously due to the power game.

Reducing the official tournament limit for younger players is not going to address these issues, nor the injury problems of over 17s.

KV
Aug 3rd, 2004, 09:25 PM
Before we start getting too much of a head of steam up on this: Are we sure the spate of player injuries are due to playing too many matches?

I have seen no evidence for this. It is very easy to assume a causal relationship that is not there, and then take hasty actions that make matters worse.

Among the most injury prone players are the Williamses who are notorious for playing a very limited schedule.

Other possible reasons for multiplying injuries include:

*Too short an off-season: Barely six weeks (and that has Hopman Cup and exhibitions)
*Poor player conditioning. Little central research into injury prevention.
*Bad playing surfaces for movement (like the notorious Rebound Ace)
*Players having to move and turn too vigorously due to the power game.

Reducing the official tournament limit for younger players is not going to address these issues, nor the injury problems of over 17s.Good post. Esp. with Rebound Ace. Many players got injured there. Rebound ace could be replaced by grass like it used to be at the Aus-Open & pre-tournaments. And on the American pro circuit a few more green clay tournaments like in the past.
The power game is as well a reason for getting injured.
For players under the AER, with a limited number of tournaments played. When they turn 18 they aren't used to be playing so much which could cause an injury. In this case I'd rather blame the AER.
The AER prevents a higher quality top 100/200 etc. ranking.

CJK
Aug 3rd, 2004, 09:41 PM
Before we start getting too much of a head of steam up on this: Are we sure the spate of player injuries are due to playing too many matches?

I have seen no evidence for this. It is very easy to assume a causal relationship that is not there, and then take hasty actions that make matters worse.

Among the most injury prone players are the Williamses who are notorious for playing a very limited schedule.

Other possible reasons for multiplying injuries include:

*Too short an off-season: Barely six weeks (and that has Hopman Cup and exhibitions)
*Poor player conditioning. Little central research into injury prevention.
*Bad playing surfaces for movement (like the notorious Rebound Ace)
*Players having to move and turn too vigorously due to the power game.

Reducing the official tournament limit for younger players is not going to address these issues, nor the injury problems of over 17s.

In this day and age, the trend of tennis matches are in favor of power players. Therefore, harder hitters like Williams sisters and Mary Pierce are prone to injuries. And therefore even more reasons to make sure they do not burn out too soon as the power game will accelerate the rate of burning out.
It's obvious that there are those who try to gain ranking points as many as possible after they grow ou tof it, we do need to prevent players from playing day in and day out just to complain later in their career that the calendar is too intense.

TheBoiledEgg
Aug 3rd, 2004, 09:59 PM
all you need is MORE CLAY and GRASS
simple solution

.ivy.
Aug 3rd, 2004, 10:00 PM
What is AER??

I hope next year that all the players will come back healthy.

KV
Aug 3rd, 2004, 10:05 PM
What is AER??

I hope next year that all the players will come back healthy.
Age Eligibility Rule that says
From your 17 till 18 birthday you can play 13 tournaments + GS
" " 16 " 17 birthday " " 10 " +GS
15 16 " " " 8 + GS
" " 14 15 " " " 7 probably without GS unlike your name is S. Karantcheva.

Doc
Aug 3rd, 2004, 11:26 PM
all you need is MORE CLAY and GRASS
simple solution

That would be good.

I don't think there were many injuries on the grass courts this year - certainly not compared with the harder surfaces.

Surely the Australians can be taught how to grow grass courts again.

Of course lengthening the off-season would be good too. Surely there's enough time in say 40-42 weeks for enough tournaments to be scheduled to satisfy everybody?

Insidermd
Aug 4th, 2004, 01:31 AM
The truth is that whether the girls are allowed to play 8 matches or 17, theyíre still going to be practicing hard just about every day. Thereís no way that they can restrict how much a player practices.

I really donít think AER is as effective as some people think. It looks good for the WTA that they have measures in place to protect their future talents, but itís really just good for looks.

Something needs to be changed about the tournaments after Wimbledon. There are mostly just indoor or outdoor hardcourt events for the last 4 plus months of the year.

SerenaVenusNo1
Aug 4th, 2004, 02:49 AM
"3) enforce harder penalty on those who try to break the rules."

LOL. Nobody has ever broken the AER rules, but the WTA has changed them.

SerenaVenusNo1
Aug 4th, 2004, 02:55 AM
Let's also remember what AER was designed to do. It was designed to prevent Jennifer Capriati from happening again, and thus far it has. It was not designed to prevent injury in young players as no doubt the WTA realizes that that is impossible. Why not just have the players not play at all? Then they won't get hurt.

Veritas
Aug 4th, 2004, 04:52 AM
More clay probably won't help stomp down on the number of injuries these days - slow-paced matches require a lot of running and court-coverage, so I'm guessing the muscles are more susceptible to stretch even more and the number of cramps would rise as well?

Grass isn't much easier on the body than hardcourts - people who've lost to Venus or Serena can tell you that.

SerenaVenusNo1
Aug 4th, 2004, 04:53 AM
More clay probably won't help stomp down on the number of injuries these days - slow-paced matches require a lot of running and court-coverage, so I'm guessing the muscles are more susceptible to stretch even more and the number of cramps would rise as well?

Grass isn't much easier on the body than hardcourts - people who've lost to Venus or Serena can tell you that.

The problem isn't wear and tear really, it's the stress hardcourts put on your knee/ankle/hip joints. They are far more demanding in those areas because there is no give in the surface, unlike clay and grass.