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Knizzle
Jun 5th, 2004, 09:45 PM
:sad: Condolences to the family.

-Ph51-
Jun 5th, 2004, 09:54 PM
Just heard it!Condolences!

fly guy
Jun 5th, 2004, 09:57 PM
awww :sad:

decemberlove
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:04 PM
rip

jbone_0307
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:27 PM
I had a dream about him dying last night. Im really scared now.

foreva lindsay
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:28 PM
okay i'm sorry but who is he ?

CondiLicious
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:30 PM
I used to have a crush on his son :o


And... It's a shame he had to go in the way he did. It's not a very dignified disease... especially for a man who had such an authoritative time in office.

I disagree with virtually all of his politics though and his double act with Thatcher... :(

ys
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:31 PM
Great man..

CondiLicious
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:32 PM
okay i'm sorry but who is he ?
He was president of the USA through most of the 1980s. A love him or hate him kind of figure. He used to be a movie star.

foreva lindsay
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:34 PM
ah thanks for telling me :)
sorry to hear about his death RIP

KoOlMaNsEaN
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:35 PM
:sad::sad::sad::sad:

CondiLicious
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:41 PM
Ex-President Ronald Reagan dies


http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39600000/jpg/_39600047_reagan_ap203body.jpg Reagan suffered from the advanced stages of Alzheimer's Disease

Former US President Ronald Reagan has died, aged 93, after reports in recent days that his health had taken a turn for the worse.

He had suffered from Alzheimer's disease, and had not been seen in public for several years.

He died at his home in California, according to a friend quoted anonymously by the Associated Press.

He was US president from 1981 to 1989 and had lived longer than any other holder of the post.

Mr Reagan revealed in November 1994 that he was suffering from Alzheimer's disease, which destroys brain cells and causes memory loss. Since then, he retreated to his home in Los Angeles, where he had been nursed by close members of his family.

Steam
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:42 PM
At least he isn't suffering anymore. I didn't like him as a president but no one deserves to go out like that.

At least now he gets to spend more time with Bonzo.

Rest in Peace.

CondiLicious
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:48 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38978000/jpg/_38978577_10.jpghttp://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38978000/jpg/_38978581_03.jpg

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38978000/jpg/_38978583_04.jpg
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38978000/jpg/_38978587_06.jpg


He certainly led an eventful life. Survived the bullet! I certainly have respect for him... If little else.

AjdeNate!
Jun 5th, 2004, 10:48 PM
I live in his former hometown, so I'm sure there will be some sort of a memorial service here. :sad:

Richie77
Jun 6th, 2004, 12:27 AM
Even though it was inevitable, it's still too bad :sad:
Especially for Nancy (his wife), who should be commended for not only protecting her husband's privacy, but for her grace and dignity during what had to be a very difficult past few years.

the cat
Jun 6th, 2004, 12:36 AM
Condolences to the Reagan family. In a way I think it's better that he passed away rather than having to suffer through the hideous disease Alzheimers any longer.

I agree with ys that Ronald Reagan was a great man. :D Whether you agreed or disagreed with his politics President Reagan was a tremendous leader who was not to be messed with. :)

Thanks for the nice pictures, DiVa.

bw2082
Jun 6th, 2004, 12:48 AM
:sad:

Ronald Reagan is the person I voted for in my 1st grade mock election

thecatinthehat
Jun 6th, 2004, 02:09 AM
Today I went to the library to get a documentary about the Cold War and when I cam back I saw on CNN that he died! :eek:

Rest In Peace

Minami
Jun 6th, 2004, 02:34 AM
I have a question,
I live in Los Angeles, why everyone is going to Santa Monica? Did he live there?

venusfan
Jun 6th, 2004, 02:42 AM
He was 93 yrs so I cant see why anyone would be shocked that he passed away. May he rip but I consider anyone over 80yrs when they die to not take it too hard because it was expected. Unless u live in China where they live to be 120

fly guy
Jun 6th, 2004, 02:45 AM
He was 93 yrs so I cant see why anyone would be shocked that he passed away. May he rip but I consider anyone over 80yrs when they die to not take it too hard because it was expected. Unless u live in China where they live to be 120
i don't think anyone is shocked, just sad.

are you saying that if something is expected, you shouldn't take it too hard? :confused: that makes no sense to me.

Scotso
Jun 6th, 2004, 03:38 AM
I feel bad for his family, but I can't think of anything nice to say about him.

antonella
Jun 6th, 2004, 03:41 AM
I have a question,
I live in Los Angeles, why everyone is going to Santa Monica? Did he live there?

he lived in a ranch in the mountains near Santa Barbara.

MisterQ
Jun 6th, 2004, 04:59 AM
:sad:

Ronald Reagan is the person I voted for in my 1st grade mock election

I voted for Mondale at age 8, lol! ;)

Reagan was president for most of my childhood, from age 4 to 12. I disagreed with a lot of his politics, but there is still a certain sadness about his passing, because it brings back all the memories of that era. :sad:

martirogi
Jun 6th, 2004, 05:50 AM
I can't believe so many people say they disagree with his politics. He was reelected by the largest margin in US history 49 of 50 states. He did so much for the country and the world in terms of spreading democracy and strengthening the economy. He is truly a great man that will be missed.

Tratree
Jun 6th, 2004, 06:13 AM
I have a question,
I live in Los Angeles, why everyone is going to Santa Monica? Did he live there?
The funeral home where he was taken is in Santa Monica. He died in Bel Air...about 15-20 minutes away. His casket will lie in state at his library in Simi Valley on Monday and I will try my best to make it out there to pay my respects.

He was the president of my youth and his passing has affected me tremendously, as I thought it would. Love him or hate him, he was a man of principles and he stood for what he believed. There was no need for popularity polls for him to gauge his beliefs by, he said what he meant and meant what he said. The man not only changed his country, he helped change the world as we know it today. I had the honor of seeing him speak at a youth conference in Washington D.C. in '88 and it is a treasured memory. I am sorry for his passing, but happy that he is now at peace and his family can finally mourn the loss of the man who left them a while back.

God rest your soul, President Reagan. I salute you.

LindsayRocks89
Jun 6th, 2004, 06:27 AM
:sad: Rest in peace, you were a great man and lived a great family, may God continue to watch over your family

Cybelle Darkholme
Jun 6th, 2004, 07:14 AM
Oh I just heard...is it too late to celebrate?

CJ07
Jun 6th, 2004, 07:15 AM
RIP Mr. President :sad:
Too bad he had to suffer, but he was old as dirt :tape:

bw2082
Jun 6th, 2004, 07:16 AM
Oh I just heard...is it too late to celebrate?


No it's not too late to celebrate his life. :o

But the way you meant it is uncalled for. :fiery:

Cybelle Darkholme
Jun 6th, 2004, 07:20 AM
No it's not too late to celebrate his life. :o

But the way you meant it is uncalled for. :fiery:
Why would i celebrate the life of someone I despise? Do you celebrate the lives of murderering thieving selfish and egomongering fanatatics?? Well thats your problem I guess.

However I agree that all life is precious even his woe begone miserable years.

Minami
Jun 6th, 2004, 08:22 AM
The funeral home where he was taken is in Santa Monica. He died in Bel Air...about 15-20 minutes away. His casket will lie in state at his library in Simi Valley on Monday and I will try my best to make it out there to pay my respects.

He was the president of my youth and his passing has affected me tremendously, as I thought it would. Love him or hate him, he was a man of principles and he stood for what he believed. There was no need for popularity polls for him to gauge his beliefs by, he said what he meant and meant what he said. The man not only changed his country, he helped change the world as we know it today. I had the honor of seeing him speak at a youth conference in Washington D.C. in '88 and it is a treasured memory. I am sorry for his passing, but happy that he is now at peace and his family can finally mourn the loss of the man who left them a while back.

God rest your soul, President Reagan. I salute you.

Thank you very much

Minami
Jun 6th, 2004, 08:23 AM
he lived in a ranch in the mountains near Santa Barbara.

Grazie mille

Mariangelina
Jun 6th, 2004, 12:35 PM
:sad: Condolences to the family.

I don't like or agree with his politics, but Alzheimer's is really such a sad disese. It's tragic for anyone to die that way.

May he rest in peace.

-Em-
Jun 6th, 2004, 12:45 PM
he was one of the smartest out there...it's really sad...
R.I.P

Rollo
Jun 6th, 2004, 01:07 PM
Cybelle,

Little known fact-

As a lifeguard Reagen saved well over 200 people from drowning. It hardly fits your picture dear.

And in Eastern Europe many people still see Reagen as the driving force behind ending Communism.

So while there may be a lot to disagree with Reagen on, he had his good points as well. Now is not to time to 'celebrate'.

C'mon sweets, I know you have more class that that.

Anyway, condolences to the family.:sad:

Kart
Jun 6th, 2004, 03:08 PM
I read about this today. Sad news, I liked him.

CondiLicious
Jun 6th, 2004, 04:58 PM
I can't believe so many people say they disagree with his politics. He was reelected by the largest margin in US history 49 of 50 states. He did so much for the country and the world in terms of spreading democracy and strengthening the economy. He is truly a great man that will be missed.Perhaps because his social policies were... pathetic. The poor got poorer, the marginalized got more marginalized. He believed in small government so the big picture got neglected. He was all for the rich... It seemed like it was "To hell with the poor" And the poor... like in most Western countries were mostly ethnic "minorities". That's why plenty of people disagree with his politics. Including me. But... Like I said before. I still respect him. He seemed a nice enough man on most levels. I try not to judge people too much on political beliefs. Also... He helped make my daddy a rich man so... That was good for me :)

Oh and also yes his massive tax cuts boosted the economy in the short term and led to people getting wealthier (like my dad) but it increased public debt which caused problems for the following administrations. That's the way massive tax cuts work! *cough* Dubya *cough*

*JR*
Jun 6th, 2004, 05:36 PM
Perhaps because his social policies were... pathetic. The poor got poorer, the marginalized got more marginalized. He believed in small government so the big picture got neglected. He was all for the rich... It seemed like it was "To hell with the poor" And the poor... like in most Western countries were mostly ethnic "minorities". That's why plenty of people disagree with his politics. Including me. But... Like I said before. I still respect him. He seemed a nice enough man on most levels. I try not to judge people too much on political beliefs. Also... He helped make my daddy a rich man so... That was good for me :)

Oh and also yes his massive tax cuts boosted the economy in the short term and led to people getting wealthier (like my dad) but it increased public debt which caused problems for the following administrations. That's the way massive tax cuts work! *cough* Dubya *cough*
I agree with the political analysis here in general. But Reagan's feet were far less "set in stone" than many think. For example, he cut taxes drastically in 1981, but agreed to a reversal of much of that a year later. He suggested Martin Luther King might have been a Communist in opposing the holiday initially, but then supported it and publicly signed the bill.

He called the Soviets an Evil Empire, but negotiated the largest nuclear cuts in history with them. He initially appointed the headstrong Al Haig as Secretary of State, but fired him after less than 2 years in favor of the calm and thoughtful George Schultz. He sided with Iraq vs. Iran during their long war, but let Ollie North sell arms to Iran. Its a complex record to sort out.

CondiLicious
Jun 6th, 2004, 06:46 PM
I agree with the political analysis here in general. But Reagan's feet were far less "set in stone" than many think. For example, he cut taxes drastically in 1981, but agreed to a reversal of much of that a year later. He suggested Martin Luther King might have been a Communist in opposing the holiday initially, but then supported it and publicly signed the bill.

He called the Soviets an Evil Empire, but negotiated the largest nuclear cuts in history with them. He initially appointed the headstrong Al Haig as Secretary of State, but fired him after less than 2 years in favor of the calm and thoughtful George Schultz. He sided with Iraq vs. Iran during their long war, but let Ollie North sell arms to Iran. Its a complex record to sort out.Well if you analyse his private life as well and then look at some of his "values" that he played on during his campaigns he was a total hypocrite! He harped on about 1950s family values... the whole "white picket fence" deal and he had been married like... 3 times? :lol: And I think he got one of them pregnant before they had said their vows!

However, I think he was more "real" than a lot of presidents. He was quite personable but then he was an actor so the skills he learned in Hollywood probably helped him in that area.

the cat
Jun 7th, 2004, 01:50 AM
Well said Rollo. :) Especially about Cybelle's hurtful and unecessary comments considering President Reagan's passing and how many people in Eastern Europe revere President Reagan for helping put an end to comminism.

Interesting comments from JR and DiVa.

Cybelle Darkholme
Jun 7th, 2004, 07:28 AM
the man can burn for all I care. When your policies or lack thereof directly cost the lives of thousands and upon thousands of people I hardly think holding up 200 saved swimmers is relevant. Yes I commend him for being a life guard but his stance to Aids crisis was appaling. And thats just part of the reason he offends me.

Halardfan
Jun 7th, 2004, 09:05 AM
I wouldn't wish his kind of death on my worst enemy so he has my genuine sympathy i that regard.

But I think he was a dreadful president, and his support for the likes of Saddam and dodgy tribal groups in Afghanistan have a legacy which gives us such trouble today.

Andy T
Jun 7th, 2004, 01:24 PM
Cybelle,

Little known fact-

As a lifeguard Reagen saved well over 200 people from drowning. It hardly fits your picture dear.

And in Eastern Europe many people still see Reagen as the driving force behind ending Communism.

So while there may be a lot to disagree with Reagen on, he had his good points as well. Now is not to time to 'celebrate'.

C'mon sweets, I know you have more class that that.

Anyway, condolences to the family.:sad:

All credit to him for his efforts as a lifeguard.

As a politician, for me he ranks second behind Margaret Thatcher as the most morally repulsive Western leader in my memory (which begins after Nixon).

Helen Lawson
Jun 7th, 2004, 01:49 PM
He never won an Oscar like I did. His hand and foot prints are not set in gold dust at Grauman's Chinese Theatre like mine, either.

Helen Lawson: 2
Ronald Reagan: 0

But, as the patriotic dame that I am, I respect him like any of our former leaders.

Helen Lawson
Jun 7th, 2004, 01:51 PM
P.S. I always thought Jane Wyman was a bitch. She does not even show up at Oscar ceremonies honoring old broads like ourselves. She may have won an Oscar before I did, but I have more nominations, so there! It is easy to play a deaf, mute girl. I was on death row! And, she did television, which is SO low class. Even Neely no longer does crap tv shows.

*JR*
Jun 7th, 2004, 01:54 PM
Cybelle, re. AIDS, the gay male community (in NYC, and probably many other places) was in such De-Nile in the 80's as to mostly OPPOSE the city ordering the notorious "bathhouses" shut down to slow transmission (via promiscuous, anonymous, generally unprotected sex between men).

I agree that Reagan could have done more (esp. re. AIDS in Africa) but when those infected because of their OWN "devil may care" attitude then call a politician a murderer when their own actions "come back to haunt them" sorry but even leftleaning me isn't buying their blame game.

the cat
Jun 7th, 2004, 04:09 PM
Well said JR. You bring a sense of balance and fairness to your posts that is not the norm at WTA World. And Helen Lawson brings a sense of humour to her posts.

griffin
Jun 7th, 2004, 05:55 PM
Cybelle, re. AIDS, the gay male community (in NYC, and probably many other places) was in such De-Nile in the 80's as to mostly OPPOSE the city ordering the notorious "bathhouses" shut down to slow transmission (via promiscuous, anonymous, generally unprotected sex between men).

I agree that Reagan could have done more (esp. re. AIDS in Africa) but when those infected because of their OWN "devil may care" attitude then call a politician a murderer when their own actions "come back to haunt them" sorry but even leftleaning me isn't buying their blame game.

Actually Roger, a lot of ACTIVISTS opposed having the bath houses closed - not because they were in denial but because they knew that being able to do prevention education in places like that gave them access to people who didn't always identify as gay or were otherwise hard to reach. They also understood that shutting them down wasn't going to do any more than put a bandaid on the problem.

And sorry, but you don't get to say you're not "buying the blame game" just because you're pointing fingers at someone ELSE. Unprotected sex is dangerous, and people were (and sadly still are) making really deadly decisions. Funny, though, that we don't NOT do research on lung cancer, or try to cure or at least treat cancer victems humanely, despite the fact that the vast majority of lung cancer is caused by that person smoking.

The one good thing that's come of his illness and death is Nancy Reagan getting religion on the way partisan politics and ideology get in the way or needed medical research (she's spoken out against Republican/Conservative efforts to ban or cripple stem cell research - research that might provide cures for alzheimer's sufferers among others). Pity it didn't happen 20 years sooner. Some of us might have fewer sick or dead friends.

I can't mourn the man, but those who loved and cared for him do have my sympathies.

Dawn Marie
Jun 7th, 2004, 06:22 PM
I think he was one of our worst presidents ever!! The man was clueless!

Rest in Peace Regan.

Helen Lawson
Jun 7th, 2004, 06:38 PM
Ted Casablanca got caught in a police raid at a bathhouse once. He explained it away to Neely that he was just there to take a bath and that he and the other guy were just washing each other's backs. Neely bought it, too. Now that's denial!

lizchris
Jun 7th, 2004, 07:16 PM
I am sorry he died, but I am not going to get into the whole hoopla surrounding his death because while he caused the fall of the Soviet Union and turned our economy around, he turned a bilnd item to the civil rights abuses (the last lynching in the US happened during his Presidency), caused massive deficits and ignored the burgeoning AIDS cricis.

lizchris
Jun 7th, 2004, 07:17 PM
BTW, the government offices will be closed on the day of Regan's furneral and it was just announced that the stock market will be closed too, so that means any public company will most likelu close too.

the cat
Jun 7th, 2004, 08:15 PM
The media is doing a good job of covering President Reagan's passing and giving him a deservingly respectful sendoff in the process.

Griffin, that was a very well written and thoughtful post. Especially what you said about unprotected sex.

*JR*
Jun 7th, 2004, 10:05 PM
Actually Roger, a lot of ACTIVISTS opposed having the bath houses closed - not because they were in denial but because they knew that being able to do prevention education in places like that gave them access to people who didn't always identify as gay or were otherwise hard to reach. They also understood that shutting them down wasn't going to do any more than put a bandaid on the problem.

And sorry, but you don't get to say you're not "buying the blame game" just because you're pointing fingers at someone ELSE. Unprotected sex is dangerous, and people were (and sadly still are) making really deadly decisions. Funny, though, that we don't NOT do research on lung cancer, or try to cure or at least treat cancer victems humanely, despite the fact that the vast majority of lung cancer is caused by that person smoking.

The one good thing that's come of his illness and death is Nancy Reagan getting religion on the way partisan politics and ideology get in the way or needed medical research (she's spoken out against Republican/Conservative efforts to ban or cripple stem cell research - research that might provide cures for alzheimer's sufferers among others). Pity it didn't happen 20 years sooner. Some of us might have fewer sick or dead friends.

I can't mourn the man, but those who loved and cared for him do have my sympathies. Cancer victims @ least direct their anger re. "being enablers" @ the industry peddling that poison, not the government. (BTW, federal research spending per HIV positive American, not even full-blown AIDS case, has exceeded that per cancer victim, even during Reagan's 2nd term).

I didn't vote for him, and disagreed with most of his policies, but I won't "add charges" for the sake of liberal orthodoxy. And re. the bath house issue, I'm sure education re. condoms was done (as was the promotion of Nonoxynol-9 as some kind of magic barrier, which later proved totally baseless. So that false sense of security that gave somewhat cancelled out the useful info).

But the bath houses thrived mainly due to a post-Stonewall refusal to let "man or microbe" deprive gay males of their relatively new freedoms (along with plain old human lust) and I think you know that. (I find it ever harder to remain a liberal in the face of self-justifying "pretzel logic" of that nature).

I totally agree with you on Stem Cell research, BTW.

moon
Jun 7th, 2004, 11:11 PM
Why is it that when somebody dies, all of the sudden they are lifted to this myth like status. I find it to be sickening sometimes, and very fake.

Anyway, I detested his policies, but like Griff said, I feel sympathy for his family. I just wish we didn't have to be bombared with media all week about it.

Infiniti2001
Jun 7th, 2004, 11:21 PM
Actually Roger, a lot of ACTIVISTS opposed having the bath houses closed - not because they were in denial but because they knew that being able to do prevention education in places like that gave them access to people who didn't always identify as gay or were otherwise hard to reach. They also understood that shutting them down wasn't going to do any more than put a bandaid on the problem.

And sorry, but you don't get to say you're not "buying the blame game" just because you're pointing fingers at someone ELSE. Unprotected sex is dangerous, and people were (and sadly still are) making really deadly decisions. Funny, though, that we don't NOT do research on lung cancer, or try to cure or at least treat cancer victems humanely, despite the fact that the vast majority of lung cancer is caused by that person smoking.

The one good thing that's come of his illness and death is Nancy Reagan getting religion on the way partisan politics and ideology get in the way or needed medical research (she's spoken out against Republican/Conservative efforts to ban or cripple stem cell research - research that might provide cures for alzheimer's sufferers among others). Pity it didn't happen 20 years sooner. Some of us might have fewer sick or dead friends.

I can't mourn the man, but those who loved and cared for him do have my sympathies.


:worship: :worship: :worship: I will never forget the hell the Grenadian (In the Caribbean)people went through just so his troops could suposedly rescue 7 medical students. :fiery: :tape:

Ballbuster
Jun 8th, 2004, 12:04 AM
Regan is the reason you see so many homless mentally ill persons on the street. He CUT the funding. The man was a monster. I feel nothing.

Also, he absolutely refused to meet with the Congressional Black Caucus. There is nothing about Regan that is positive. Nothing....and let's not talk about that big ass deficit.

Dawn Marie
Jun 8th, 2004, 12:45 AM
great post Ballbuster!:):) Keep on bustin them balls, keep on.:)

*JR*
Jun 8th, 2004, 12:53 AM
:worship: :worship: :worship: I will never forget the hell the Grenadian (In the Caribbean)people went through just so his troops could suposedly rescue 7 medical students. :fiery: :tape:
Actually, the students (a couple of dozen, I think) were 2B "expelled" from Grenada, which essentially means released. IMO, the actual reason for the invasion was the death of the 241 Marines in Beirut a few days earlier, to re-establish a pro-military action sentiment.

I'm quite sure that had Reagan been nominated in '76 (he narrowly lost to Nixon's appointed successor, Jerry Ford) he would have been clobbered by a then-untarnished Jimmy Carter in November. (Even with his terribly failed record in '80, Carter was close until Reagan's good performance in their one debate near the end).

Infiniti2001
Jun 8th, 2004, 04:05 AM
66 (Unflattering) Things About Ronald Reagan

By David Corn, The Nation
June 6, 2004

Editor's Note: This list of "66 Things to Think about When Flying in to Reagan National Airport" appeared in the Nation on March 2, 1998 after the renaming of Washington National Airport after Ronald Reagan. As Corn says, "the piece remains relevant today – particularly as a cheat sheet for those who dare to point out the Reagan presidency was not all that glorious and was more nightmare in America than morning in America."


The firing of the air traffic controllers, winnable nuclear war, recallable nuclear missiles, trees that cause pollution, Elliott Abrams lying to Congress, ketchup as a vegetable, colluding with Guatemalan thugs, pardons for F.B.I. lawbreakers, voodoo economics, budget deficits, toasts to Ferdinand Marcos, public housing cutbacks, redbaiting the nuclear freeze movement, James Watt.


Getting cozy with Argentine fascist generals, tax credits for segregated schools, disinformation campaigns, "homeless by choice," Manuel Noriega, falling wages, the HUD scandal, air raids on Libya, "constructive engagement" with apartheid South Africa, United States Information Agency blacklists of liberal speakers, attacks on OSHA and workplace safety, the invasion of Grenada, assassination manuals, Nancy's astrologer.


Drug tests, lie detector tests, Fawn Hall, female appointees (8 percent), mining harbors, the S&L scandal, 239 dead U.S. troops in Beirut, Al Haig "in control," silence on AIDS, food-stamp reductions, Debategate, White House shredding, Jonas Savimbi, tax cuts for the rich, "mistakes were made."


Michael Deaver's conviction for influence peddling, Lyn Nofziger's conviction for influence peddling, Caspar Weinberger's five-count indictment, Ed Meese ("You don't have many suspects who are innocent of a crime"), Donald Regan (women don't "understand throw-weights"), education cuts, massacres in El Salvador.


"The bombing begins in five minutes," $640 Pentagon toilet seats, African-American judicial appointees (1.9 percent), Reader's Digest, C.I.A.-sponsored car-bombing in Lebanon (more than eighty civilians killed), 200 officials accused of wrongdoing, William Casey, Iran/contra. "Facts are stupid things," three-by-five cards, the MX missile, Bitburg, S.D.I., Robert Bork, naps, Teflon.


David Corn, Washington editor of the Nation, is author of 'The Lies of George W. Bush: Mastering the Politics of Deception.'

perfect balance for the media praisefest. Yes I am :devil: :tape:

http://www.alternet.org/story.html?StoryID=18874

Tratree
Jun 8th, 2004, 06:26 AM
Here is a great article written by President Reagan's daughter that is in Newsweek this week.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5147743/site/newsweek/

A Daughter's Remembrance: The Gemstones of Our Years
Time taught me to appreciate a distant father—and cherish glimpses of an elusive soul

By Patti Davis
Newsweek

June 14 issue - The house I grew up in had large plate-glass windows, which birds frequently crashed into headfirst. My father helped me assemble a bird hospital, consisting of a few shoe boxes, some old rags and tiny dishes for water and food. When I lost my first patient, when the tiny gray creature died in my hands without ever eating any of the Cheerios I'd provided for it, my father patiently explained to me that the bird was free now, flying happily through the blue breezes of heaven, where there are no hazards such as windows. I was locked into his eyes, locked into the story. My father was always more accessible when he was teaching his children through stories.

[/url][url="http://ad.doubleclick.net/jump/newsweek.national;kw=national;sz=300x250;ord=29719 ?"] (http://ad.doubleclick.net/click;h=v2|3123|0|0|*|a;7730751;2-0;0;8991083;4307-300|250;5375128|5393024|1;;~fdr=7725222;0-0;0;8600601;4307-300|250;4902316|4920212|1;;?https://microsoft.order-4.com/onenotedl/handoff.asp?id=onbnws)Thirty-five years later, I would walk beside him along the beach, after he had already begun slipping into the shadows of Alzheimer's. A dark thief, it steals portions of a person, leaves remnants behind. He looked up at a flock of seagulls soaring overhead and his eyes followed them, shining with something I couldn't decipher, but which I interpreted as longing.

The years between those two events were often war-torn, weighed down with sorrow—with words he found difficult to say and words I wish I'd never said.

My father was a shy man; he wasn't demonstrative with his children. His affection didn't announce itself with strong embraces of dramatic declaration. We had to interpret it. Like delicate calligraphy, it required patience and a keen eye, attributes I had to acquire. I was not born with them.

Eventually, I grew beyond the girl who wanted more from her father than he was able to give. I began to focus on the gifts he gave me. He taught me to talk to God, to read the stars, respect the cycles of nature. I am a strong swimmer and a decent horsewoman because of him. I plucked from the years the shiniest memories, strung them together. It's what you do with someone who is always a bit out of reach. You content yourself with moments; you gather them, treasure them. They are the gemstones of the years you shared.

I returned to my family, the prodigal child, in October 1994, two months before my father disclosed to the world that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. It's been reported that his disease brought us back together. That's not quite true—it happened earlier, when my mother and I laid down the armaments of our long dispiriting war, allowing the rest of the family to breathe easier, drift toward one another. But the chronology doesn't really matter; the coming together does. I returned in time to say goodbye to my father, to witness his steady withdrawal from this world.

Losing a parent is an experience that has no comparison. Like childbirth, it exists beyond the realm of language: our words strive, but never completely describe it. At first, grief carries you out like a tide to an ending you always knew would come, but couldn't possibly be prepared for. With a long, relentless illness like Alzheimer's, you remember every detail of the journey, every slow mile you traveled.

Hope dies along the way—the hope that things will someday change between you and your parent; you'll be less hesitant, perhaps, with each other, more open. During the last couple of years, I would sit beside my father, silence floating between us, knowing that we would never be any more to each other than we were right then.

I don't know whether the loss is easier or harder if a parent is famous; maybe it's neither. My father belonged to the country. I resented the country at times for its demands on him, its ownership of him. America was the important child in the family, the one who got the most attention. It's strange, but now I find comfort in sharing him with an entire nation. There is some solace in knowing that others were also mystified by him; his elusiveness was endearing, but puzzling. He left all of us with the same question: who was he? People ask me to unravel him for them, as if I have secrets I haven't shared. But I have none, nothing that you don't already know. He was a man guided by internal faith. He knew our time on this earth is brief, yet he cared deeply about making his time here count. He was comfortable in his own skin. A disarmingly sunny man, he remained partially in shadow; no one ever saw all of him. It took me nearly four decades to allow my father his shadows, his reserve, to sit silently with him and not clamor for something more.

I have learned, over time, that the people who leave us a little bit hungry are the people we remember most vividly. When they are alive, we reach for them; when they die, some part of us follows after them. My father believed in cycles—the wheel of birth, and life, and death, constantly turning. My hand was tiny when he held it in his and led me to a blackened field weeks after a fire had burned part of our ranch. He showed me green shoots peeking out of the ashes. New life. I let go of his hand for too long, pushed it away, before finally grasping it again, trusting that even in his dying, I would find new life.

Helen Lawson
Jun 8th, 2004, 01:28 PM
That is a nice article, but Patti Davis is a nut. First a thinly-veiled unflattering autobiography. Next a Playboy Magazine spread. Then a topless kickboxing video for Playboy Magazine. I do NOT approve of nudity. Ronald Jr. does dog show commentary. Word around Hollywood is that Nancy cut them off financially years ago to save money for Reagan's illness and they barely ever saw him after that. I hope they are nice to Nancy now, even if it is to get back into her good graces. Jane Wyman may have been a bitch, but her children turned out better.

*JR*
Jun 8th, 2004, 02:18 PM
That is a nice article, but Patti Davis is a nut. First a thinly-veiled unflattering autobiography. Next a Playboy Magazine spread. Then a topless kickboxing video for Playboy Magazine. I do NOT approve of nudity. Ronald Jr. does dog show commentary. Word around Hollywood is that Nancy cut them off financially years ago to save money for Reagan's illness and they barely ever saw him after that. I hope they are nice to Nancy now, even if it is to get back into her good graces. Jane Wyman may have been a bitch, but her children turned out better.
Sorry Helen. The late Maureen Reagan was largely estranged from her father.... until he became President, Ahem. (And she got a White House advisory Role, Ran for the Senate, etc). Michael shamelessly used his adoptive father's name to promote himself for a conservative radio talk show. (The only real difference between them and Ron/Patti was that Mo was @ his side with Nancy till she lost her battle with cancer nearly three years ago).

lizchris
Jun 8th, 2004, 02:47 PM
Also, there will be no mail delivery on Friday due to his funeral.

Helen Lawson
Jun 8th, 2004, 03:40 PM
Sorry Helen. The late Maureen Reagan was largely estranged from her father.... until he became President, Ahem. (And she got a White House advisory Role, Ran for the Senate, etc). Michael shamelessly used his adoptive father's name to promote himself for a conservative radio talk show. (The only real difference between them and Ron/Patti was that Mo was @ his side with Nancy till she lost her battle with cancer nearly three years ago).
They do not commentate dog shows or do topless kick boxing videos or pose nude.

Tratree
Jun 8th, 2004, 06:16 PM
Patti Davis has definitely had her kooky periods, but she was there for her parents when they needed her and for that I tip my hat to her. Her mother will remember that more than the disappointments and pain she caused.

*JR*
Jun 8th, 2004, 06:20 PM
Patti Davis has definitely had her kooky periods, but she was there for her parents when they needed her and for that I tip my hat to her. Her mother will remember that more than the disappointments and pain she caused.
Sometimes. (Maureen, not even Nancy's own daughter, was the one she could rely on until Mo died of cancer in '01). BTW, ppl with names like Patti are known to have their kooky periods. ;)

Helen Lawson
Jun 8th, 2004, 06:34 PM
Is there some reason why Nixon did not receive a state funeral? What he did seems so unserious given those who came after him (except Jimmy Carter). Nixon was a big fan, too, he came to many of my Broadway shows and we exchanged Christmas cards. He always said to me, "knock 'em dead, Hel." Nixon was the ONLY person I permitted to refer to me as "Hel" to my face.

Tratree
Jun 8th, 2004, 07:11 PM
Nixon and his family chose not to have the state funeral.

lizchris
Jun 8th, 2004, 07:28 PM
Is there some reason why Nixon did not receive a state funeral? What he did seems so unserious given those who came after him (except Jimmy Carter). Nixon was a big fan, too, he came to many of my Broadway shows and we exchanged Christmas cards. He always said to me, "knock 'em dead, Hel." Nixon was the ONLY person I permitted to refer to me as "Hel" to my face.
Nixon's family chose not to have a state funeral due to the way he left office.