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View Full Version : What common Grammatical errors bug you the most


Eurotennisfan
May 9th, 2004, 09:39 PM
*when people write "your" instead of you're (esp. on MSN)


*When people say "Come with Mike and "I""

* the it's its thing bugs me a lot too ;)

Leo_DFP
May 9th, 2004, 09:44 PM
there/their, its/it's, quotation marks inside the period, and others which have escaped my mind.

Eurotennisfan
May 9th, 2004, 09:46 PM
there/their, its/it's, quotation marks inside the period, and others which have escaped my mind.

do you mean like... "hello".

It is grammatically ok that do it either way. I think one is American English and another is British English so either way is just fine.

emptyhead
May 9th, 2004, 09:49 PM
i, not Am bothered",, by non off this Grammeratrical.? arrows

Dava
May 9th, 2004, 09:53 PM
I hate all the american spellings, Im not good at spellings to they just throw me off sometimes.

Eurotennisfan
May 9th, 2004, 10:10 PM
I hate all the american spellings, Im not good at spellings to they just throw me off sometimes.

So true! :worship: :worship:

I also hate teaching little kids (grades 1-3). You start do doubt the spelling of almost every word.

One time I was like "Is Dog spelled with two Gs?" :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

gentenaire
May 9th, 2004, 10:32 PM
When will people learn to spell definitely? Or learn the difference between to and too?

Pureracket
May 9th, 2004, 10:38 PM
Nobody on this board can spell "choked" nor can we spell "oops"(we spell it "opps") when we make a mistake. We won't even get into the fact that many people on this board (Dawn Marie- I love you) refer to one adult female as a "women" every time.

bw2082
May 9th, 2004, 10:45 PM
your/you're, there/they're/their, its/it's, sit/set, irregardless, thinking you know how to use me/I when you don't (ie... come with mike and I when it should be mike and me)

decemberlove
May 9th, 2004, 10:46 PM
no one is two words . it is not noone . ugh

CC
May 9th, 2004, 10:48 PM
I find that spending time on this board has very very negative effect on my spelling ability.

Cariaoke
May 9th, 2004, 10:50 PM
when someone means know and they type "now" and vice versa. of course all homophones are kryptonite to board users. *shakes head*

Colin B
May 10th, 2004, 01:03 AM
People writing could of, should of, would of! :rolleyes:


The word is have or, if you'd rather abbreviate, ~'ve!

:mad:

Josh
May 10th, 2004, 01:05 AM
Then and than because I make that mistake constantly. :sad:

MisterQ
May 10th, 2004, 01:16 AM
I am bothered by the use of "less" when it should be "fewer," especially from people who should know better (newscasters, advertisers, et al.)

esquímaux
May 10th, 2004, 01:41 AM
YUO! YUO! YUO! :wazzup: It's crazy, but I like it :D

MisterQ
May 10th, 2004, 03:57 AM
Shouldn't this thread title have a question mark? ;)

j/k

alexusjonesfan
May 10th, 2004, 04:14 AM
The most fun one is the loose/lose switch. It's great fun :D

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 04:17 AM
I hate when people type in all caps and link sentences to form one paragraph without any punctuations. I haven't come across those in here (thank God!) though.

Their and there, it's and its and you're and your are bad mistakes too.

They should learn from basics again!

Eurotennisfan
May 10th, 2004, 04:31 AM
Shouldn't this thread title have a question mark? ;)

j/k
lol :lol: :bounce: :lol: :lol:

bigshow21
May 10th, 2004, 04:36 AM
Shouldn't this thread title have a question mark? ;)

j/k


:lol: :lol: That was my laugh for the day!!!

bigshow21
May 10th, 2004, 04:40 AM
I cant stand that one thread title: Will & Grace is worser than Seinfeld
or whatever it is. Eeeewwww i hate that!!!!

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 04:44 AM
The most fun one is the loose/lose switch. It's great fun :D

Interesting one.

I think:

Loose is an adjective, ie, she is a bit loose :p
Its verb form is Loosen, p. Loosened, pp. Loosened, ie, 'loosen up dude!'

Lose is a verb, p. Lost, pp. Lost
Loss is its noun form.

It's almost as commonly mistaken with lay and lie.

Rtael
May 10th, 2004, 04:47 AM
Then and than because I make that mistake constantly. :sad:

Just remember, than is for making comparisons like "My dick is bigger THAN your dick." While then is for talking about sequential events like "First, I beat Josh upside his head, THEN I stole his wallet." Hope that helped.


Anyway, the ones that bother me the most are "chocked" for "choked" and "loose" for "lose."

bigshow21
May 10th, 2004, 04:47 AM
When i type on AIM/MSN and on this board i never use correct punctuation. Mostly i wont capitolize or put commas or appostraphes(however u spell that word?? lol). It is so much easier to type without it. Besides everyone knows what u are saying anyways.

Giuliano
May 10th, 2004, 08:04 AM
The infamous "Her draw is a catwalk", and "she has the face of a cereal killer" :lol:.

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 08:30 AM
The infamous "Her draw is a catwalk"

I have no comment on players' draws :tape:

and "she has the face of a cereal killer" :lol:.

I hope it's Honeynut Shreddies. :drool:

"Sluggy"
May 10th, 2004, 08:33 AM
Nobodys poor spelling bothers me on the board. In my work, I have to be extremely careful with spelling and grammar. Thats why enjoy coming here and slaughtering the inglish language. Only when the errors are soooo terrible that you cant understand what there saying does it annoy mi.

Avid Merrion
May 10th, 2004, 08:53 AM
When will people learn to spell definitely?
:mad: that particular spelling mistake bugs me the most too.

OUT!
May 10th, 2004, 12:41 PM
:mad: that particular spelling mistake bugs me the most too.i fink their rite to

Avid Merrion
May 10th, 2004, 01:04 PM
i fink their rite to
:lol: i thinkted u mite bee rite! :tape:

~ The Leopard ~
May 10th, 2004, 01:10 PM
The unnecessary capitalisation of words is always an annoying Grammatical error. ;)

"Sluggy"
May 10th, 2004, 01:55 PM
tough crowd

"Sluggy"
May 10th, 2004, 02:05 PM
Studies have shown that poorly educated destitute people try to speak with better diction and grammar WHILST afflent peolpe try to speak like the common man.

"Sluggy"
May 10th, 2004, 02:05 PM
woops, I mean affluent, and afflent WHILST the mispelling of peolpe was entirely and defitinetley intentional.

CC
May 10th, 2004, 02:50 PM
Taken from Writer's Digest:

Infinitive: to lay
Definition: To put, or to place something down. Example: I lay down the book.
Present: lay(s)
Past: laid
Past Participle: laid
Present Participle: laying

Infinitive: to lie
Definition: to rest or recline. Example: I lie down to sleep.
Present: lie(s)
Past: lay
Past Participle: lain
Present Participle: lying

Enjoy!

emptyhead
May 10th, 2004, 03:10 PM
What a sorryass bunch of losers you all are if all you can bitch about are grammatical errors

Zamboni
May 10th, 2004, 03:15 PM
In Dutch: d/t-errors :o
In English: none, I'm sure I make plenty ;)

MisterQ
May 10th, 2004, 06:04 PM
Taken from Writer's Digest:

Infinitive: to lay
Definition: To put, or to place something down. Example: I lay down the book.
Present: lay(s)
Past: laid
Past Participle: laid
Present Participle: laying

Infinitive: to lie
Definition: to rest or recline. Example: I lie down to sleep.
Present: lie(s)
Past: lay
Past Participle: lain
Present Participle: lying

Enjoy!

thanks for posting that one. It's always tricky, not only because they have different uses (one takes a direct object and the other does not), but also because the present tense of one is the same as the past tense of the other!

I almost never hear people say "I have lain..."

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 06:42 PM
Haha, JollyRoger please take note!!

All of the aforementioned errors annoy me, especially "could / should of".

However, I guess people can't help it, either because they aren't native speakers, or there have been gaps in their education. After all, these mistakes should have been aired out at school.

What really pisses me off, and it doesn't apply to a message board, is people who don't speak properly. By that I mean, people who purposely omit the "t" in words such as water or Martin, or people who don't pronounce the end of words, simply trailing off into the next one.

And also, verb conjugation. It is you were and we were, not you was and we was, as some people prefer to say. There are others similar to this, but I can't think of them off the top of my head now.

My friends get annoyed when I helpfully try to correct them, the ungrateful buggars... :rolleyes:


Actually....imo....it's the native speakers who make these sorts of mistakes....

I agree with you though, if one gets upset because another tries to correct ones grammatical mistakes, one is indeed very ungrateful and immature.

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 06:56 PM
Taken from Writer's Digest:

Infinitive: to lay
Definition: To put, or to place something down. Example: I lay down the book.
Present: lay(s)
Past: laid
Past Participle: laid
Present Participle: laying

Infinitive: to lie
Definition: to rest or recline. Example: I lie down to sleep.
Present: lie(s)
Past: lay
Past Participle: lain
Present Participle: lying

Enjoy!

In addition:

And to lay: to put something in place, ie. I lay the plates on the dinner table.
Present: lay(s)
Past: laid
Past Participle: laid


I must admit I have never used the lie/lay/lain (although learnt it in school) and probably would make the mistake if we didn't mention it here.

Smackie
May 10th, 2004, 06:58 PM
Oh and I thought of another one.

When people use the word "whom" because they think it sounds more important than plain and simple "who" - there is a difference between the two!! :o


Yep, that's because they can't tell the difference between subjects and objects....at least it's how I remember it anyway.

Hendouble
May 10th, 2004, 07:09 PM
I don't think it's used much on this board, but more and more I keep hearing people say "At the minute" - aarrghhhh!!! It's "at the moment" or "this minute", OK?

I don't want to sound like some stereotyped Brit ranting on about American butchery of the language, but here are two American words that never fail to irritate: "dove" (as in past tense of "to dive") and "normalcy".

saki
May 10th, 2004, 09:03 PM
Inappropriate apostrophe usage is what gets me every time. Also, sentences that have no main verb - I've spent years now translating Latin & Greek so it really unnerves me when I can't find a main verb... The other one is split infinitives because I was taught not to use them and therefore can't help but spot them.

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 01:00 AM
The other one is split infinitives because I was taught not to use them and therefore can't help but spot them.
I know exactly what you mean.
People who split, knowingly, an infinitive. :rolleyes:

:)

Carolina Girl
May 11th, 2004, 01:16 AM
on here no one bothers me with grammatical errors, i probably do, 'cause i just get lazy and don't capitalize or type out the whole word, like i did with because, it's just easier to type 'cause, omitting one letter:p ok ok i'm lazy and yes i know i love to use commas:p

Kart
May 11th, 2004, 01:17 AM
tho'

HELLO it's THOUGH.

I think it's because someone who annoys me anyway always writes that in his emails.

It's completely irrational. Or rather, I am :).

Kart
May 11th, 2004, 01:18 AM
No offence intended to anyone who says tho' though.

alexusjonesfan
May 11th, 2004, 01:28 AM
I know exactly what you mean.
People who split, knowingly, an infinitive. :rolleyes:



:)

Hey, English ain't Latin. I take great pride in being able to intentionally, dramatically and repeatedly split my infinitives. :ras:

Eurotennisfan
May 11th, 2004, 01:29 AM
;)

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 03:27 AM
While I was laying in bed the other day, I decided to boldly split at least one infinitive as soon as I got a chance. This is, of course, an odd thing to be thinking about while laying in bed. It's so much better to think about it at a time when you're just lying there alone. Such thoughts have, alas, a certain anaphrodisiac effect.

Mr. Man
May 11th, 2004, 03:33 AM
The only ones that REALLY bother me is You're spelled like Your and Lose spelled like Loose. :rolleyes:

alextreiber04
May 11th, 2004, 03:34 AM
I'm not sure if it's a grammatical error, but when people say 'It was so fun' or 'This was so fun' it pisses me off and I think inside my head so much fun.

decemberlove
May 11th, 2004, 03:40 AM
tho'

HELLO it's THOUGH.

I think it's because someone who annoys me anyway always writes that in his emails.

It's completely irrational. Or rather, I am :).
i use thou all the time . even THOU i know that it is really though . its just easier to shorten it . and tho is just ugly :)

decemberlove
May 11th, 2004, 03:57 AM
Haha, JollyRoger please take note!!

All of the aforementioned errors annoy me, especially "could / should of".

However, I guess people can't help it, either because they aren't native speakers, or there have been gaps in their education. After all, these mistakes should have been aired out at school.

What really pisses me off, and it doesn't apply to a message board, is people who don't speak properly. By that I mean, people who purposely omit the "t" in words such as water or Martin, or people who don't pronounce the end of words, simply trailing off into the next one.

yes, the use of of rather than 've appears A LOT . i remember proofing papers in high school where people would do that all the time . and yknow formal papers dont usually allow contractions . just clueless people

umm ... but you would HATE my accent then . cos i drop t's and r's all the time . you still love me thou, right? :kiss:

and will someone explain split infinitives to me . cos i dont remember ever learning about them :) i feel stupid

JustineTime
May 11th, 2004, 04:22 AM
Awl of em. Becoz Im purrfect! :angel:

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 12:10 PM
and will someone explain split infinitives to me . cos i dont remember ever learning about them :) i feel stupidThere are examples of infinitives that have been mercilessly split in posts Nos. 47, 51 and 53.......and this one!

I'm sure more examples I could be, should the need arise, found.;)

:D

saki
May 11th, 2004, 12:32 PM
There are examples of infinitives that have been mercilessly split in posts Nos. 47, 51 and 53.......and this one!

I'm sure more examples I could be, should the need arise, found.;)



:D
No, yours isn't a split infinitive. An infinitive is something like "to do" or "to become". "Could be found" is a different verb form (passive subjunctive? I'm not great at English grammatical terms I just assume that they're the same as Latin and hope). A split inifinitive is when you put a word in between "to" and the verb, e.g. "to boldly go". I actually agree with the person who said that there's no particular reason not to split infinitives in English. In Latin, it's impossible to split an infinitive since an infinitive is all one word - e.g. "ambulare" means "to walk" and that's supposedly why we're taught not to split them in English. Sometimes splitting them in English makes writing clearer (and sometimes it doesn't) and then, in theory, I think it's ok. It's just that years of school teachers telling me off for them makes me notice them and shudder involuntarily.

saki
May 11th, 2004, 12:34 PM
While I was laying in bed the other day, I decided to boldly split at least one infinitive as soon as I got a chance. This is, of course, an odd thing to be thinking about while laying in bed. It's so much better to think about it at a time when you're just lying there alone. Such thoughts have, alas, a certain anaphrodisiac effect.
That reminds me... I once managed to completely put an ex of mine "out of the mood" (let your imagination do the work, here!) by starting a conversation about gerunds in bed. Most unfortunately, I found this hysterically funny which, um, put him even more "out of the mood". Oh, well...

OUT!
May 11th, 2004, 12:42 PM
However, all of this is no big deal. Ultimately, we know what the other person is trying to say. Just being picky.

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 12:48 PM
No, yours isn't a split infinitive. An infinitive is something like "to do" or "to become". "Could be found" is a different verb form (passive subjunctive? I'm not great at English grammatical terms I just assume that they're the same as Latin and hope). A split inifinitive is when you put a word in between "to" and the verb, e.g. "to boldly go". I actually agree with the person who said that there's no particular reason not to split infinitives in English. In Latin, it's impossible to split an infinitive since an infinitive is all one word - e.g. "ambulare" means "to walk" and that's supposedly why we're taught not to split them in English. Sometimes splitting them in English makes writing clearer (and sometimes it doesn't) and then, in theory, I think it's ok. It's just that years of school teachers telling me off for them makes me notice them and shudder involuntarily.So "To mercilessly split" is not a split infinitive, but "to boldly go" is?

Oh well, you're the Oxbridge classics graduate and I dropped out of a UMIST engineering degree.

I will have to humbly defer to your greater knowledge.



:worship:

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 12:55 PM
But you didn't say "to mercilessly split", Colin. You said that they "have been mercilessly split" or something like that. I can see the analogy you have in mind, but it's not technically a split infinitive unless an infinitive - a "to X" type construction - has been split, with the "to" separated from its verb.

I'd advise you to very carefully pay attention to saki's grammatical advice (or mine for that matter). :p

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 01:00 PM
Personally, I find split infinitives rather ugly and clumsy. I avoid them when I can, though sometimes they are the lesser of two evils, i.e. the alternative is something even clumsier. In the usual case, though, "to go boldly where no man [sic] has gone before" sounds a lot clearer and crisper than "to boldly go [etc.]".

*wondering whether saki is the only person on the board who appreciated my lay/lie post*

OUT!
May 11th, 2004, 01:02 PM
*wondering whether saki is the only person on the board who appreciated my lay/lie post*Not really, because grammar has never been my strong point. :o :tape: :)

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 01:04 PM
As for gerunds, the issue is when you have a true gerund on you hands and must use the possessive case. I have to say that I often avoid strict grammaticality here, because it can sound pretentious. In many cases, there is no alternative but to use to the possessive: "My swimming leaves much to be desired." But I get away without it whenever I can.

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 01:07 PM
But you didn't say "to mercilessly split", Colin. You said that they "have been mercilessly split" or something like that. I can see the analogy you have in mind, but it's not technically a split infinitive unless an infinitive - a "to X" type construction - has been split, with the "to" separated from its verb.

I'd advise you to very carefully pay attention to saki's grammatical advice (or mine for that matter). :pI will Joui, I will. As soon as I have deconstructed your last sentence and rearanged it so that it sensibly reads. :kiss:

:D

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 01:11 PM
I will Joui, I will. As soon as I have deconstructed your last sentence and rearanged it so that it sensibly reads. :kiss:



:D
Oh Fuck. Now my spelling has gone.

Kart
May 11th, 2004, 01:12 PM
i use thou all the time . even THOU i know that it is really though . its just easier to shorten it . and tho is just ugly :)
Thou is fine :yeah:.

It's the apostrophe in tho' that drives me mad :explode:.

Can't explain it, except that maybe I'm :crazy:.

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 01:16 PM
Well Colin, I see I wrote "you hands" instead of "your hands". :rolleyes: @me :D

saki
May 11th, 2004, 01:19 PM
So "To mercilessly split" is not a split infinitive, but "to boldly go" is?

Oh well, you're the Oxbridge classics graduate and I dropped out of a UMIST engineering degree.

I will have to humbly defer to your greater knowledge.





:worship:
As The Leopard said, you didn't actually say "to mercilessly split" ... ;)

I don't think degree of education really has much to do with it. I've come across very intelligent people who make many many grammatical errors and fairly dim people who can get grammar right every time. It all depends on what sort of school you went to. Mine was extremely traditional and had us doing endless grammar exercises. Other people probably had more fun, though...

saki
May 11th, 2004, 01:23 PM
As for gerunds, the issue is when you have a true gerund on you hands and must use the possessive case. I have to say that I often avoid strict grammaticality here, because it can sound pretentious. In many cases, there is no alternative but to use to the possessive: "My swimming leaves much to be desired." But I get away without it whenever I can.
It's again one of the things that I notice but don't particularly object to when other people get it wrong. Doing much Latin and Greek makes me very conscious of things like gerunds (I hear my Latin teacher in my head saying "that's a verbal noun, treat it like a noun") and I really can't not be strictly grammatically correct myself because it just annoys me. Bizarrely, it doesn't annoy me as much with other people, just me...

And, loved the lay/lie post :kiss:

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 01:36 PM
It all depends on what sort of school you went to. Mine was extremely traditional and had us doing endless grammar exercises. Other people probably had more fun, though...I'm afraid you see before you, complete with all it's failings, a product of the English Public School system.

:rolleyes:

I could probably confirm your worst suspicions!

:)

Colin B
May 11th, 2004, 01:40 PM
Well Colin, I see I wrote "you hands" instead of "your hands". :rolleyes: @me :DWell of course, I, erm, noticed but I didn't want to appear pedantic. :angel:

:D

~ The Leopard ~
May 11th, 2004, 01:54 PM
Hmmmm: "it's failings...". :tape: ;) :angel:

CC
May 12th, 2004, 12:59 AM
Splitting infinitives? I don't recall being taught that. Then again, I used to daydream a lot in school. I would say though, that I much prefer to split than not split. That's one rule that I don't mind breaking. It's just my natural writing style to complicate sentences. I am trying to consciously ( :p ) change that though.