PDA

View Full Version : Which country is the main contributor to EU enlargement?


Josh
May 2nd, 2004, 07:32 PM
In terms of money per capita that goes to the enlargement of the EU, which country actually pays the most?

Take a guess.....

Dahveed
May 2nd, 2004, 07:36 PM
Norway :p i read that somewhere.

Elske
May 2nd, 2004, 07:52 PM
http://www.ebaumsworld.com/forumfun/whocares2.jpg
:p

veera
May 2nd, 2004, 07:59 PM
I believe it's Netherlands or German....

Norway :p i read that somewhere.

That's weird, since Norway is not a part of EU :rolleyes:

gentenaire
May 2nd, 2004, 08:07 PM
Slovenia maybe?

Martian Willow
May 2nd, 2004, 08:10 PM
...Afghanistan...?

Elske
May 2nd, 2004, 08:11 PM
my guess is Belgium! i want to be n° 1 in every statistic! :silly:

crazillo
May 2nd, 2004, 08:11 PM
Germany I think.

gentenaire
May 2nd, 2004, 08:18 PM
That's weird, since Norway is not a part of EU :rolleyes:actually, come to think of it, that may actually be the very reason Norway is paying a lot. Others don't have to pay to get access to the EU market, Norway and Switzerland OTOH....

Dahveed
May 2nd, 2004, 08:35 PM
I believe it's Netherlands or German....



That's weird, since Norway is not a part of EU :rolleyes:
Don't you roll your eyes at me, i know what i read :p I'm sure i'm right since Josh didn't reply yet and i embarassed him with my incredible knowledge!

Els lol nice carpet.

Josh
May 2nd, 2004, 09:40 PM
Well Dahveed is right (for once :p)!

Norway pays the most per capita for the enlargement of the EU. And Tine gave the correct reason, Although Switzerland isn't paying a single Euro. :o

Norway main contributor to new EU member states

Norway will be an important financial supporter of enlargement which takes place in May this year.

Norway, which is not actually a member of the European Union, is to pay 205.8 million euro in annual contributions for the 10 new EU member states.

This is due to an European Economic Area (EEA) agreement which gives Norway access to sell products within the Internal Market but also obliges the country to pay a contribution to the EU structural funds.

By comparison, Sweden is to pay only 64-84 million euro per year and the Danes 19-25 million euro, reports Norwegian daily Nationen.

Per inhabitant Norway is to contribute 137.2 euro per citizen to enlargement, while the Germans are to pay 18.60 euro per citizen, the French 10.20 euro, Italians 14.0 euro, the Dutch 46.9 euro and the British 17.7 euro.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

No contribution to EU enlargement from Switzerland

Switzerland will succeed in renewing its trade deals with Brussels without committing one single Swiss Franc to the EU enlargement, reports Norwegian daily Nationen.

The European Commission as well as the Swiss part has confirmed the information, according to Nationen.

This news has received some attention in Norway, because Norwegians were forced some months ago to pay 1.7 bn crowns (210 million euro) per year between 2004 and 2009 in return for their new agreement on access to the internal market of the enlarged EU.

The deal made the Norwegians main contributors to enlargement, paying more per capita than any of the EU member states.

Access to Internal Market
Switzerland held some strong cards in the negotiations with Brussels. A great deal of the heavy-goods transported in Europe passes through the Alpine country.

On top of this, Swiss banks have been firm on maintaining the famed secrecy of their banks - despite pressure from the EU.

Swiss relations to the EU are built on a free trade agreement dating back to 1972, known as Bilateral I.

In June 2002, seven new agreements went into force, named Bilateral II. And soon – a final compromise will be reached – ten new agreements will be ready, named Bilateral III.

The Swiss government spokesman, Adrian Sollberger, said to Nationen that the agreement with the EU does not necessarily mean Switzerland will stop supporting poor Eastern European countries.

"For a long time we have supported them. But our attention in development policies has lately moved from those countries becoming members of the EU to other states – to the Balkans and to former Soviet states. I do not know, if we are to reconsider the priorities", he said.

Josh
May 2nd, 2004, 09:41 PM
And :ras:@Elske!