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View Full Version : Which grip to use?


Vass22
Apr 7th, 2004, 11:09 AM
Can someone tell me which grip is better for a power game with top spins? Or does it realy matter? Right now I don't put any top spin on the ball and because of it can only hit the ball hard when I'm half way between the service line and the base...
I'm playing tennis for two years and I'm good enough to send the ball to the side I want it to go from the baseline, when there's not much pressure. I"m also wondering if it will be easier to learn to use spins with a single-handed backhand or double-handed. I still haven't decided which one to use and play one shot using one hand and the other shot using two. My backhand is my weaker side.

Tatiana Panova
Apr 7th, 2004, 11:23 AM
For a really powerful allround game use a semi-western on the forehand. You will be able to hit with topspin but also able to flatten it out. Put the racket on the floor and pick it up - that is roughly a semi.

Do not get too hung up with topspin though. From the baseline you want a topspin drive where by it is a flatter shot with enough topspin. Remember always try to hit through the ball rather than just always brushing over it. Too much topspin ruins forehands in general! To practice your forehand get the loop right - so turn your shoulders and take the racket higher than your left arm (now at the side) and lower the racket so you are brushing up from a low to high position. Now extend the racket out in a upward motion so that the racket is fully extended out, and naturally finishes around the throat.

What I am saying therefore is to concentrate on the mechanics first (slowly) and the grip should come naturally. For midcourt shots you are going to have to get some whipping topspin on them. But always remember if you take the ball at the top of the bounce or before it reaches its apex - you can hit a flatter shot and it will go over the net.

As for backhand - I would say use a twohander if you are struggling. Practice one handed drills (using left hand). You want a chopper grip on your right hand (like a hammer) and a semi or eastern on the left (like shaking hands with the racket)

Another topspin drill - practice hitting short ball rallies in teh service box, and it forces you to reduce your swing and hit with more topspin.

Hope that helps. Remember it will not come overnight, and could take a few months!:)

faste5683
Apr 7th, 2004, 11:48 AM
For a really powerful allround game use a semi-western on the forehand. You will be able to hit with topspin but also able to flatten it out. Put the racket on the floor and pick it up - that is roughly a semi.

Do not get too hung up with topspin though. From the baseline you want a topspin drive where by it is a flatter shot with enough topspin. Remember always try to hit through the ball rather than just always brushing over it. Too much topspin ruins forehands in general! To practice your forehand get the loop right - so turn your shoulders and take the racket higher than your left arm (now at the side) and lower the racket so you are brushing up from a low to high position. Now extend the racket out in a upward motion so that the racket is fully extended out, and naturally finishes around the throat.

What I am saying therefore is to concentrate on the mechanics first (slowly) and the grip should come naturally. For midcourt shots you are going to have to get some whipping topspin on them. But always remember if you take the ball at the top of the bounce or before it reaches its apex - you can hit a flatter shot and it will go over the net.

As for backhand - I would say use a twohander if you are struggling. Practice one handed drills (using left hand). You want a chopper grip on your right hand (like a hammer) and a semi or eastern on the left (like shaking hands with the racket)

Another topspin drill - practice hitting short ball rallies in teh service box, and it forces you to reduce your swing and hit with more topspin.

Hope that helps. Remember it will not come overnight, and could take a few months!:)

That's fantastic advice! I would like to add that the decision on whether to use one or two hands on the backhand will come naturally. They both have advantages and disadvantages. Experiment with both of them and see what you come with. With a one hander, don't get into the habit of placing your thumb *behind* the racket handle, make sure you wrap it around the handle, in an eastern grip (think Henman), or a severe eastern (think Justine, Guga).

Try to use your non-hitting hand as the *guide*. Use it to *push* or *pull* the racket back during your backswing, ensuring a good shoulder turn.

Good luck!

:wavey:

Vass22
Apr 7th, 2004, 12:14 PM
That great guys! Thanks for the help! I'll try it out today.