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Sam L
Feb 18th, 2004, 03:59 AM
When do you think was the Golden Age of tennis? Or do you think we're going through it now? --> Unless you're a new fan of tennis, I hardly think that anyone would agree it's now.

Some say that the Golden Age was the 70's with the beginings of the women's tennis tour and with stars like: Court, King, Evert, Navratilova, Goologong. A lot of people say that these were the years of most competitive tennis. But is this also true in the men's? We had Borg, Connors, McEnroe. So perhaps the 70's were the Golden Age of tennis.

What do you think? Any other era that could be classified as this?

I think early 90's could be another one. The women's side still had Navratilova, Graf, Seles, Capriati, Sabatini, and the men's side had Courier, Agassi, Sampras, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg etc...

What do you think?

QUEENLINDSAY
Feb 18th, 2004, 06:16 AM
I choose 1990's!!! the beginning and the end of it. Though not much during mid 90's.

#1 Lindsay
Feb 18th, 2004, 07:12 AM
1997-2001

Andy T
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:24 AM
1997-2001

I'll go with the following:
1971-5 with the four queens - Chrissie Evonne BJK and Margaret Court.
1979-82 - Chrissie Evonne Martina Tracy and Hana all winning slams (+ Andrea Jaeger)
1985-87 - Chrissie Martina Hana Steffi and Gaby
1990-92: Monica Steffi Martina Gaby and Arantxa.
1998-02 Martina Lindsay Venus Serena and Jenny (+ Mary Pierce) (though a bit less than the others)

The changing of the guard periods, when the next generation challenges the supremacy of the previous one are always the best.

Right now we should be having a golden period if only everyone were fit and healthy. :mad:

hingis-seles
Feb 18th, 2004, 09:29 AM
I'll go with the following:
1971-5 with the four queens - Chrissie Evonne BJK and Margaret Court.
1979-82 - Chrissie Evonne Martina Tracy and Hana all winning slams (+ Andrea Jaeger)
1985-87 - Chrissie Martina Hana Steffi and Gaby
1990-92: Monica Steffi Martina Gaby and Arantxa.
1998-02 Martina Lindsay Venus Serena and Jenny (+ Mary Pierce) (though a bit less than the others)

The changing of the guard periods, when the next generation challenges the supremacy of the previous one are always the best.

Right now we should be having a golden period if only everyone were fit and healthy. :mad:
Exactly! :worship:

emptyhead
Feb 18th, 2004, 09:59 AM
I would hazard a guess that .The golden-age would be each fans own generation, when their favourites were playing. Although today’s fans seem more interested in the players than the tennis. Well the ones on this board are

CinnamoninCinema
Feb 18th, 2004, 10:10 AM
This year could herald a new "golden age". If the Sisters both get healthy, and the Belgians are able to at least trade off wins with them, we'll have four players dueling for the Slams for the foreseeable future ... something which has never been really sustained for very long.

faste5683
Feb 18th, 2004, 11:50 AM
What do you think? Any other era that could be classified as this?

I think early 90's could be another one. The women's side still had Navratilova, Graf, Seles, Capriati, Sabatini, and the men's side had Courier, Agassi, Sampras, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg etc...

I agree with you, the early 90's were a hot-bed of talent. Then again, *any*
era with Justine playing would be golden.

:angel:

:wavey:

tennisvideos
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:07 PM
I'll go with the following:
1971-5 with the four queens - Chrissie Evonne BJK and Margaret Court.
1979-82 - Chrissie Evonne Martina Tracy and Hana all winning slams (+ Andrea Jaeger)
1985-87 - Chrissie Martina Hana Steffi and Gaby
1990-92: Monica Steffi Martina Gaby and Arantxa.
1998-02 Martina Lindsay Venus Serena and Jenny (+ Mary Pierce) (though a bit less than the others)

The changing of the guard periods, when the next generation challenges the supremacy of the previous one are always the best.

Right now we should be having a golden period if only everyone were fit and healthy. :mad:

Good choices. I would also add perhaps 63-66 with Court, Bueno, King, Richey, Turner, Jones et all. My fave period would have been the early 70s tho.

bandabou
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:12 PM
I'll go with the following:
1971-5 with the four queens - Chrissie Evonne BJK and Margaret Court.
1979-82 - Chrissie Evonne Martina Tracy and Hana all winning slams (+ Andrea Jaeger)
1985-87 - Chrissie Martina Hana Steffi and Gaby
1990-92: Monica Steffi Martina Gaby and Arantxa.
1998-02 Martina Lindsay Venus Serena and Jenny (+ Mary Pierce) (though a bit less than the others)

The changing of the guard periods, when the next generation challenges the supremacy of the previous one are always the best.

Right now we should be having a golden period if only everyone were fit and healthy. :mad:

Good choices....man the ´98- ´02 era was SOOOOOOOOOO good! I think ´99 had the best GS-matches I´ve seen.

supah-fly
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:14 PM
I would say the Hingis, Davenport, Venus, Serena, Pierce, Steffi, Monica, and Kournikova era.

In the men's....the early 90's with Sampras, Agassi, McEnroe, Courier, Chang, Lendel, Edberg.

alfajeffster
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:28 PM
I'd have to say from reading the books that the first golden age for the women was 1920-1928, when Helen Wills Moody, Suzanne Lenglen, Molla Mallory, and Hazel Hotchkiss Whitman were all dazzling the world's tennis stage during a wild and impetuous flapper era. In the words of Norma Desmond: "they had faces then".

Bill Tilden and the Four Musketeers were all the rage at the same time, and tennis was in vogue. It was very much a rich man's game, however, wealthy jazz babies were all most people clamored about during that decade. Think Great Gatsby.

After that, for the women, my vote goes for the great tennis boom of the mid-1970s. There was a stretch between 1970-1975 when Court, King, Goolagong, Navratilova, Evert, Wade, and many other greats were all playing arguably the best tennis women have ever played.

For the men, my vote goes with 1954-1962, when the Australian Dynasty ruled. I've said it before, and am only saying it from having seen precious few film clips, but I don't think any man has ever played tennis as well as Lew Hoad when he was on. Couple that with the great Ken Rosewall, Frank Sedgman, Neale Fraser, the pro talents of Pancho Gonzalez, and the emergence of Rod Laver (not to mention Americans Tony Trabert, Vic Seixas, and Jack Kramer).

bandabou
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:32 PM
I'd have to say from reading the books that the first golden age for the women was 1920-1928, when Helen Wills Moody, Suzanne Lenglen, Molla Mallory, and Hazel Hotchkiss Whitman were all dazzling the world's tennis stage during a wild and impetuous flapper era. In the words of Norma Desmond: "they had faces then".

Bill Tilden and the Four Musketeers were all the rage at the same time, and tennis was in vogue. It was very much a rich man's game, however, wealthy jazz babies were all most people clamored about during that decade. Think Great Gatsby.

After that, for the women, my vote goes for the great tennis boom of the mid-1970s. There was a stretch between 1970-1975 when Court, King, Goolagong, Navratilova, Evert, Wade, and many other greats were all playing arguably the best tennis women have ever played.

For the men, my vote goes with 1954-1962, when the Australian Dynasty ruled. I've said it before, and am only saying it from having seen precious few film clips, but I don't think any man has ever played tennis as well as Lew Hoad when he was on. Couple that with the great Ken Rosewall, Frank Sedgman, Neale Fraser, the pro talents of Pancho Gonzalez, and the emergence of Rod Laver (not to mention Americans Tony Trabert, Vic Seixas, and Jack Kramer).

And those are all matches/ players you actually saw playing?!

Can´t imagine calling a period golden age just by watching some black and white clips of it.

alfajeffster
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:40 PM
And those are all matches/ players you actually saw playing?!

Can´t imagine calling a period golden age just by watching some black and white clips of it.Tennis first began in the 1800s in Europe as Court Tennis- a sport of Kings. The game as we knew it (until the mid 1980s bastardization of racquet size, but that's another thread) remained virtually unchanged from WWI until just the past 10-15 years. I can't imagine someone dismissing 90 years of automobiles in favor of being able to "see" the current production model.

Close your eyes for a minute and use all of your imagination. Then open your eyes for a minute and grab a good book on the history of this great game. Read what other players who were there and who did play the greats have to say. Evaluate the whole of tennis history for yourself- the tennis world is your oyster, bandabou!

bandabou
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:46 PM
Tennis first began in the 1800s in Europe as Court Tennis- a sport of Kings. The game as we knew it (until the mid 1980s bastardization of racquet size, but that's another thread) remained virtually unchanged from WWI until just the past 10-15 years. I can't imagine someone dismissing 90 years of automobiles in favor of being able to "see" the current production model.

Close your eyes for a minute and use all of your imagination. Then open your eyes for a minute and grab a good book on the history of this great game. Read what other players who were there and who did play the greats have to say. Evaluate the whole of tennis history for yourself- the tennis world is your oyster, bandabou!

I know, I know...the past is also important( maybe even more important than the now?)

"Sluggy"
Feb 18th, 2004, 08:52 PM
I love tennis just the way it is now. Most people who are not currently fans but once were, look back on Bjorn Borg as the torch carrier, and when he left the scene, so too did the viewers. In some ways we are fortunate that tennis is not overexposed. we can get good tickets to matches, at good prices. An annex seat at Roland Garros during the qualifiers is about 8 bucks, the same as a bleacher seat in a baseball game. and you get more for your money, meet players, get photos and autographs. Ill be sad if all of that changes one day, and it could if it got too popular and commercial. thats my viewpoint.

I know, I know...the past is also important( maybe even more important than the now?)

alfajeffster
Feb 18th, 2004, 09:07 PM
I love tennis just the way it is now. Most people who are not currently fans but once were, look back on Bjorn Borg as the torch carrier, and when he left the scene, so too did the viewers. In some ways we are fortunate that tennis is not overexposed. we can get good tickets to matches, at good prices. An annex seat at Roland Garros during the qualifiers is about 8 bucks, the same as a bleacher seat in a baseball game. and you get more for your money, meet players, get photos and autographs. Ill be sad if all of that changes one day, and it could if it got too popular and commercial. thats my viewpoint.
Terrific point Paul! I think Arthur Ashe Stadium is a perfect example of what it will be like if it all gets to big and commercial. The U.S. Open as a whole has become one big, giant concrete corporate mass that is moving away from fan-friendliness at breakneck speed. I have been to Rod Laver Arena, and just recently Roland Garros, and the comparisons are mind boggling. What are the movers and shakers at the USTA thinking? Arthur Ashe Stadium is too big for tennis. Anyone who has sat up in the nosebleed seets can attest- the one thing missing is being able to watch the tennis. It's like watching it from a window seat on a 727 (which isn't too far above your head if you look up from there)!

DA FOREHAND
Feb 18th, 2004, 11:24 PM
Mac, once suggested they take the top tier of the stadium off. My friends would like to attend a slam event, and suggested the Us Open because of it's close proximity, but I'd rather watch from my couch.

flyingmachine
Feb 18th, 2004, 11:36 PM
This year could herald a new "golden age". If the Sisters both get healthy, and the Belgians are able to at least trade off wins with them, we'll have four players dueling for the Slams for the foreseeable future ... something which has never been really sustained for very long.

I'm agree with you but I'm also thinking some of the Russians should beefy up a bit. They have a neat game but they do lack in power if they have a bit of power to cambat the Williams and the Belgiums then it will be ever more interesting.

flyingmachine
Feb 18th, 2004, 11:38 PM
I agree with you, the early 90's were a hot-bed of talent. Then again, *any*
era with Justine playing would be golden.

:angel:

:wavey:

:lol: You must be a Justine fan.