1985 - TennisForum.com
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2014, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
1985

2015 will be the 30 year anniversary of 1985, one of most thrilling years in women's tennis.

For the last 3 years Martina Navratilova had dominated her sport. Chris Evert was a distant second at best, having lost 13 consecutive times to Martina. Her last victory over Navratilova had been in 1982.

Tracy Austin and Andrea Jaeger were history at this point, Pam Shriver still showed no signs of breaking through, and no one else was on the horizon.

Hana Mandlikova had an above average 1984-but she was Hana after all, do who knew what to expect?

At the start of the year it was all status quo, Martina like a perennial Mount Everest over all the rest.

By the end of the wild ride of 1985 Mount Everest still stood, but the landscape of women's tennis had been altered for good.

Come on in and lets talk about one of my favorite years in women's tennis!

Last edited by Rollo; Dec 17th, 2014 at 01:59 AM.
Rollo is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2014, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
Re: 1985

The Top Ten Songs for 1985 (will put links to videos here-help please!)

1 Wham! Careless Whisper

2 Madonna Like a Virgin

3 Wham! Wake Me up Before You Go-Go
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIgZ7gMze7A

4 Foreigner I Want to Know What Love Is
5 Chaka Khan I Feel for You
6 Daryl Hall and John Oates Out of Touch
7 Tears For Fears Everybody Wants to Rule the World
8 Dire Straits Money for Nothing
9 Madonna Crazy for You
10 A-ha Take on Me

Watch these videos and it gives you some idea about why teased hair and bad clothes ruled the 80s!

Last edited by Rollo; Dec 17th, 2014 at 01:57 AM.
Rollo is online now  
post #3 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2014, 01:46 AM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
Re: 1985

One of the up and comers was Susan Sloane, featured in the article below.
The article also providea glimpse into the tennis academy system that Nick Bolletieri pioneered.

`Life` Giving Sloane A Star Treatment


December 11, 1985|By Jim Sarni, Staff Writer

POMPANO BEACH — A day in the life of junior tennis player Susan Sloane.

Or rather, Life in the day of Susan Sloane.

The Lexington, Ky., 15-year-old, the top player on the United States` Continental Players Cup team, is the subject of a feature story for the March issue of Life magazine devoted to today`s teen-agers.

And for the past week, Sloane has been getting the star treatment.

Wednesday a Life photographer showed up in Bradenton to begin shooting Sloane at Nick Bollettieri`s Tennis Academy, where she lives and trains.

Monday the photographer was still on Sloane`s trail as she walked along the beach and relaxed in her motel room. Tuesday the scene shifted to the Pompano Beach Tennis Center, where Sloane helped the top-seeded Americans survive a 2-1 opening-round victory over Yugoslavia in the Continental Players Cup.

After Yugoslavia`s Karmen Skulj defeated Cammy McGregor 6-3, 6-2, Sloane stopped Aila Winkler 6-3, 6-2 to even the singles. McGregor and Stephanie London then beat Skulj and Winkler 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) in the deciding doubles.

One can`t blame Life for focusing on Sloane. She is bright, talented and attractive. Agents have been whispering in her ear since she was 11.

Sloane could be one of America`s elite by the end of the decade. Right now, Sloane is tentatively ranked No. 3 in the country in Girls` 18s behind Stephanie Rehe and Mary Joe Fernandez. Rehe turned pro at the U.S. Open and has won two tournaments. Fernandez began to be a headliner when she became the youngest player to win a match in a pro tournament, at Bonaventure in 1984.

Sloane, who turned 15 last week, has been making slower, but steady, strides. After winning the Girls` 18 hardcourts, her fifth national title, she won the USTA pro tournament in Birmingham, Ala., then qualified for the U.S. Open.

``Pro tennis is my goal, and I`m working on it,`` said Sloane, a ninth- grader. ``I`ve done well at the nationals and in some pro tournaments. But I still have a long way to go.``

Sloane will get her first pro ranking Jan. 1, but she is not going to rush into a full-time professional career.

``I`ll turn pro when I`m ready,`` she said. ``Rehe turned pro at the right time. She played pro tournaments for about two years first.``

Sloane is grooming her game at Bollettieri`s, the finishing school of many pros.

``In Lexington, there are not many people to play with,`` said Sloane, who does not ride a horse or shoot an 18-foot jump shot from the top of the key.

``My coach has been working with Nick, and I decided to move there at the end of September. It`s a lot easier at the academy. Everything is right there, the tennis, Nautilus. In Kentucky, I`d have to go to all these different places.``

Sloane, the daughter of a dry-cleaner, started playing at 6; she is a typical teen-ager off the court. She listens to Duran Duran, reads Danielle Steele and watches Family Ties.

She does not seem to be in too much of a hurry to turn pro and make a million dollars.

But this week she has gotten a taste of the glamorous Life.

``I guess all the attention goes along with being a tennis player,`` Sloane said. ``It`s something you have to deal with. I can handle it.``

At the Sunshine Cup in Plantation, the defending champion United States beat Denmark 2-1 in its first match. John Boytim and Juan Farrow won their singles matches but lost the doubles.

Top-seeded Sweden, No. 2 Argentina and No. 3 Yugoslavia also advanced.

http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/198...he-tennis-usta
Rollo is online now  
 
post #4 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 23rd, 2014, 03:03 PM
BCP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: London
Posts: 1,971
                     
Re: 1985

As a Chris fan, 85 was both very exciting and a huge disappointment. Obviously the French final was a huge highlight, but the US Open SF was a damp squib, and I think Chris was really really nervous at the AO final. Martina was still a strong favourite, but I think the Kooyong grass suits Chris's game better than the Wimbledon grass, as the ball sits up higher.

The match of the year for me was Hana's victory over Martina in the US Open final. What a match!
BCP is offline  
post #5 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 23rd, 2014, 04:08 PM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
As a Chris fan, 85 was both very exciting and a huge disappointment. Obviously the French final was a huge highlight, but the US Open SF was a damp squib, and I think Chris was really really nervous at the AO final. Martina was still a strong favourite, but I think the Kooyong grass suits Chris's game better than the Wimbledon grass, as the ball sits up higher.

The match of the year for me was Hana's victory over Martina in the US Open final. What a match!
I wonder if the nerves at the Aussie were due to # being in the balance. Had Evert won it she would have more or less regained #1.

Hana's victory in the US final was clutch. Those two tiebreaks were heart stoppers!

Hana flies


Last edited by Rollo; Dec 23rd, 2014 at 04:32 PM.
Rollo is online now  
post #6 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 23rd, 2014, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
Re: 1985

USTA Video highlights of the 1985 US Open:


Women's action from 4 minutes 22 seconds.

Another candidate for match of the year was Graf over Shriver in 3 tiebreaks-the first time it ever happened at the US Open and Steffi's first slam semifinal. THAT match on video would be a keeper!

The Graf-Navratilova semi starts at 5:17--Evert and Mandlikova at 6:30.

Hana-Martina at 9:04 (There has never been a better volley at match point IMO)

It ends with women's doubles at 14:10.
Rollo is online now  
post #7 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 23rd, 2014, 04:24 PM
KV
Senior Member
 
KV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Under the deep blue sky
Posts: 198,939
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
I wonder if the nerved at the Aussie were due to # being in the balance. Had Evert won it she would have more or less regained #1.

Hana's victory in the US final was clutch. Those two tiebreaks were heart stoppers!

Hana flies

My all time women's tennis favourite match. By far more winners than UE's errors. On this day Navratilova needed exceptional volley's what didn't happen. But she didn't volley badly.
KV is offline  
post #8 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 23rd, 2014, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 22,726
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
On this day Navratilova needed exceptional volley's what didn't happen. But she didn't volley badly.
Yep-Hana was just on fire at times. Martina must have had nightmares about tiebreaks at the US Open-fisrt 1981 vs Tracy and then this.
Rollo is online now  
post #9 of 49 (permalink) Old Dec 24th, 2014, 03:09 AM
Senior Member
 
PamShriver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: In a Hottub with Judy Nel
Posts: 907
                     
Re: 1985

Such an intriguing year! Martina's level definitely dropped a bit (or did everyone else's level rise?), she lost two matches in the first couple of months to Evert and Mandlikova in South Florida and Princeton. Then she and Hana played an epic VS semi, which anticipated their U.S. Open final. She then lost to Kohde in Canada as well as two more losses to Chris and Hana in Paris and Flushing Meadow. I guess she was bound to lose some of the intensity that she had been carrying for basically two years straight, and she was already showing signs of vulnerability in the second half of '84. Still, both Hana and Chris raised their level and more importantly began to sense they had a shot.

Chrissie's year was one of the strangest of her career, yes, she beat Martina twice and ended the 13 match losing streak and kept her own Slam streak going with her emotional win in Paris, but I think she dropped the ball in the Wimbledon final and I think that match really set the course for the rest of the year, had she won that one I think her confidence level would've shot through the roof, but she doubted herself in the end and I think it effected her the rest of the years. She also began to have more bad losses than she used to, losing to Garrison on clay and Jordan at the Slims (I know she'd lost to her before, but this was only a couple weeks after her win over Martina and you'd think she'd be on a high).

That's what she said!!!
PamShriver is offline  
post #10 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 04:59 PM
Senior Member
 
Ms. Anthropic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 9,514
                     
Re: 1985

Kathy Horvath's official tennis career earnings were $220,905. Likely she was not pulling in much endorsement money or appearance fees. Currently, the median yearly salary for a neurosurgeon in the U.S. is about $350,000. Horvath will be 50 years old this year, so she would still have had a few more good years left in her career if she had taken the surgeon route. You do the math.

WHEN A YOUNG PRO SEES ONLY FROM BASELINE TO NET
Peter Alfano
The New York Times
February 17, 1985

DELRAY BEACH, Fla. -- JOHN BASSETT stood in the rear of the interview room clutching a single long-stemmed rose, a proud father watching his daughter speak to the news media about tennis in the same matter-of-fact way she might discuss her favorite music video with a friend.

Carling Bassett was dressed in a pink-and-salmon colored tennis warm-up suit. Her hair was pulled back in a ponytail, revealing two glittering silver earrings. She is 17 years old, but wise now in the ways of professional tennis, and feeling older than her years.

When she discussed her trepidation about facing the newer players, she referred to her own two-year experience on the tour in terms of ''when I was young and coming up.'' In the rear of the interview room, her parents laughed.

''They're laughing,'' Miss Bassett said in a gently scolding tone, ''because they still think I'm in the womb.''

It is generally accepted that parents are protective of their children, perhaps overly protective at times - trying to shelter them from some of life's harsh realities. But in the world of junior and professional tennis, the issue has become a question of whether the sport is exploiting its youth, with parents contributing to the process.

Tennis prodigies are being groomed for the professional tour too soon, according to critics such as Tracy Austin, Tim Mayotte and a parent, Erika Horvath, at the expense of a more balanced life and their physical well-being. Many parents, it is said, are motivated by dollar signs, not the best interests of their children. They celebrate the achievements of their children as if they were their own.

''I think it was my father's decision when I turned pro,'' said Jonathan Canter, who is 19 years old and has been struggling for two years on the tour. ''It was always Jonathan do this or Jonathan do that. It looked great to me, but my dad pushed me and my mom said, 'Oh, that's great.' ''

Agents are portrayed as striking bargains with the baby-faced baseliners they meet at the myriad junior tournaments that serve as professional auditions.

''Parents have money on their minds,'' Tracy Austin said, ''and agents are going up to 12-year-olds. I heard that a 10-year-old was approached.''

''I don't see the attitude in parents that mine had,'' said Martina Navratilova, the No. 1 player in the world. ''If I did my best, then it didn't matter if I won or lost. But now, it's win, win, win, at all costs.''

Bob Kain, a player representative in the tennis division of International Management Group who has represented Bjorn Borg and Miss Austin among others, said: ''We try to talk to the mom and dads to keep it in perspective. What have I got to say to a 12 or 13 year old?

''I don't care if a player is 14 or 16 years old, it's not because of agents that they're having problems. Agents are just telling the parents what's out there.

''But everyone wanted to throw the blame on someone. Some agents may try to be buddy, buddy with kids a little too early.''

Tennis is a sport in which teen-agers are capable of excelling at the highest level, especially women, who reach physical maturity more quickly than men. Even among the men, there has been a recent influx of youth - including such players as Jimmy Arias, Boris Becker, Aaron Krickstein and Stefan Edberg - because this is a game that emphasizes technique over brute force. Thus, the importance of size is diminished.

Still, the physical stress placed on the developing body of a teen-ager who practices several hours every day may be taking its toll in injuries. There are no statistics or studies to document the stress but many people involved with tennis see an increase in injuries. Prominent female players such as Miss Austin, Andrea Jaeger and Pam Shriver have been chronically hurt. Erika Horvath, whose daughter, Kathy, has had a fair amount of success but also has had injury problems, laments that she allowed her daughter to play so much tennis.

''As a mother who has a frail 8- or 9-year-old daughter like we did, I should have discouraged Kathleen from playing four or five hours a day,'' Mrs. Horvath said. ''But once a child tastes success, she's trapped. To win, you have to work hard.''

At the inaugural Lipton International Players Championships held here for the past two weeks, several novices have advanced to the later rounds against seasoned players.

Among them, Steffi Graf, a 15-year- old from West Germany, lost in the semifinal to Chris Evert Lloyd. Mary Joe Fernandez, a 13-year-old from Miami, advanced to the fourth round before losing to Hana Mandlikova.

In her postmatch interviews, Miss Fernandez, who is in the eighth grade, said that her breakthough in this tournament would not change her thinking about the future. ''I am planning to go to college,'' she said. ''School is more important to me.''

But Gigi Fernandez, who is 20 years old and currently Miss Navratilova's doubles partner, envisions complications for Mary Joe Fernandez's plans.

''People are always looking for a fresh new face,'' she said. ''The promoters and sponsors of tournaments will give Mary Joe a wild card into events. She may never go to college. She'll be happy to finish high school.''

There is more concern voiced by the women than the men about the impact of competitive tennis on the young because women tend to turn professional at a younger age and - with the injuries suffered by Miss Shriver, Miss Austin and Miss Jaeger - appear to pose a greater problem.

The Eligibility Commission of the International Tennis Federation has heard comments from parents such as Mrs. Horvath and coaches and has recommended that several rules changes be considered. One would prohibit a player from turning professional before the age of 16. Another would limit the number of tournaments those under age 16 could enter.

The parents and coaches recommended that there be no international tournaments for players 12 years of age and under. They also asked that rankings for those players be eliminated.

The recommendations have only fueled the controversy. Miss Austin, for example, said she does not believe that any organization should place restrictions on players. ''It's up to the parents to make sure their kid's life is balanced and not one-dimensional,'' she said.

Kathy Horvath, who is 19 years old said that tennis provided her with an activity and purpose in life. ''After school, the kids would be hanging out at the mall with drugs,'' she said. ''I gave up going to a dance, but I came home with a trophy.''

Mrs. Lloyd favors limiting the number of tournaments for young players but questions the legality of such a rule. ''You can't prevent anyone from earning a living,'' she said. ''Still, it's important to stay in school.''

The Women's Tennis Association is offering college correspondence courses to help players further their education. Seminars are held to counsel players about their responsibilities to the sport and how to deal with agents, sponsors and the news media. Miss Austin said she would gladly be part of a player's committee that would counsel junior players about what lies ahead.

But some of the younger players on the tour are taking correspondence courses just to finish high school, and have no desire to continue their education. Even those with good intentions find it difficult to study when they are concentrating on tennis. Those traveling around the world with a coach or a parent still get homseick.

''Even the most seasoned pros do,'' said Shawn Foust, a 17-year-old amateur who is trying to decide whether to become a professional. ''But when you're young and good enough, you've got to turn pro. You can't put tennis on hold.''

Becker, a 17-year-old from West Germany, argued that while his classmates at home are reading about the United States, he has an opportunity to receive a first-hand education.

Yet after he was eliminated in an early round of the tournament here last week, Becker confined himself to the tennis grounds, waiting to move on to the next stop on the tour. Players find refuge in a hotel room and escape with the stereo headsets they wear like clothing.

''It's so lonely it's scary,'' Canter said. ''I know they say it's lonely at the top, but that's a good feeling because you think you're invincible. And there's only one John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl.

''For the rest, there is a lot of bitterness, envy and jealousy on the tour. I like the guys but we all stand in one another's way. I can't go out drinking with them and talking about girls and tennis. You just lose and go back to the hotel room alone.''

''The first year, especially, is very difficult,'' said Mayotte, who went to Stanford University for three years before turning professional. ''I'm 24 years old and it hasn't been until the last year and a half that I've felt comfortable. You can go to museums and things but you're really in a city to play tennis. You become very focused.''

Mayotte kept a diary of his travels last year that was recently published in Tennis magazine. What was revealing was how much he wrote about tennis, rather his favorite diversions. ''It's frightening and sad,'' he said. ''You become so self-indulgent. I even have a hard time reading.

''Still, it blows my mind when we travel to an exciting city like Paris and the guys say 'TV stinks here. There's nothing to do.' I've had exposure to other things and frankly, it's hard for me to find a lot of peers on the tour, guys to share conversations with on the same level.''

Gigi Fernandez said that she recently enrolled in a creative writing course offered by the W.T.A. because she thought she was suffering from mental atrophy on the tour. ''It's kind of boring going a day not learning anything,'' she said. ''But it's hard to tell a 13-year-old to read a newspaper or watch the news. Younger kids don't understand. When we play Trivial Pursuit on the tour, you find out just who went to school.''

Instead of cautioning their children against unrealistic expectations, some parents are driven by the thoughts of money, glamour and fame. Tennis lessons and a coach can cost $10,000 a year, Mrs. Horvath said, and there are those who may push their child on the pro tour to justify the expense.

''But with us it was never a thought about the money,'' she said. ''You just become so involved. I'd be a liar if I said I did not enjoy Kathleen's wins and taking her everywhere. She was 15 when she became a professional. It was like having a bright child in school who you advanced a grade. But I realize now her life was too one- sided.''

On occasion, Mrs. Horvath said, she told her daughter: ''give me your racquets, I'll crack them in two.'' But her daughter always refused.

''I had put too much work into tennis,'' Kathy Horvath said. ''When I was growing up I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, and even though some people think I haven't done much since I turned pro, I'd have to be a damn good surgeon to make what I'm making.

''I know that I pushed myself too hard at times,'' Miss Horvath added. ''When I was 10 years old, I wanted to play every day. If it snowed, I'd be upset. Now, I take every Sunday off and feel refreshed. But my mother thinks I'm frail like all mothers think their kids are frail. Even Martina's mother must say, 'my poor little Martina.'''

Jonathan Canter said he wished his father were more sympathetic. When he was 14 years old, Jonathan was the youngest player to earn points in the Association of Tennis Professional rankings. The tennis computer ranks him 141st now. He played the piano, composed music and was intrigued by computers, but he did none of those things as well as he played tennis. He said he felt he never had a choice.

''My father, Stan, played at U.C.L.A. when he was in college,'' Canter said. He was a good player and still plays three hours a day. But he was living through me and when I would succeed, it was as if his child had nothing to do with it.

''It took a while for me to tell him how I felt,'' Canter said. ''I said, 'Dad, there is only one way you can help me. Don't say anything. I love you but the only way I can succeed is if I can relax.' So many kids win for their parents' love. And I was under pressure to please my parents.''

Dr. Herb Krickstein, whose son Aaron developed into a world-class player in 1983 when he was 16, said, that parents must often give their children a push in the right direction. If his son was unsure about playing tennis or had been gifted in school, said Dr. Krickstein, who is a pathologist, then he would not have allowed him to become a pro.

''A parent's opinion is mandatory,'' he said. ''If Aaron were having conflicts, it would have been wrong to push him, just like it would have been wrong to want him to become a physician. You know, a lot of kids go to college and don't do so well.

''But in this competitive world, if you go halfway on something, it won't work. The life of a pro is getting shorter and shorter on the high end. If you wait too long, you can miss out on the opportunity.''

Krickstein's tennis education was speeded up when his father enrolled him in Nick Bollettieri's Tennis Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Bollettieri is a controversial figure in the sport, a coach whose strict school is considered a farm system for the pros.

Bollettieri has become a wealthy man because many parents have sent their children to him in preparation for a professional career. Among his students are Krickstein, Jimmy Arias, Miss Horvath, Miss Bassett and Lisa Bonder. ''So many see the pot of gold,'' he said. ''But for every one I've turned pro, we get 37 or 38 kids college scholarships.''

The children live at the academy year round.They attend classes in the morning and have scheduled social functions such as dances, parties and outings. Still, Bollettieri makes no pretense that tennis is what they are here to learn.

''I talk to them every other week about education and how I feel it's the most important thing,'' he said. ''But it's not for me to judge what the parents are doing. It's easy to say what you would do until you have a 14- or15-year-old child who is offered a three-year contract for $1 million. Then you make a decision.''

What Bollettieri does in his private tennis academy, many countries are now doing through their national federations. In Europe, gifted players become full-time tennis students when they are 11 and 12 years of age.

The success of Sweden's program is an illustration. A country with a small population, it has produced seven world-class tennis players through a national program that has thrived off the popularity and success of Bjorn Borg.

''Tennis has become a tremendous business,'' Bollettieri said, ''and parents are realizing the rewards. It's tough to stop once the ball is rolling.''

But it appears that better guidelines for players and parents are needed in a sport that has grown so quickly. More studies might be commissioned, for instance, to determine the physical risk a youngster takes when he or she practices for several hours a day.

Ultimately, however, the decision rests with the tennis prodigy and the parents. Tennis is an international sport and one country's mores cannot be imposed on another. One parent's beliefs cannot be legislated for the majority.

''There is a time to be one-dimensional in your life, to be the best you can be at something,'' Mayotte said. ''If you do something well, it's an inspiration for others to do it well. But it should be a conscious choice.

''And when you're 16 or 17, you just don't know. You're believing everything that you're fed. And parents are believing it, too.''
Ms. Anthropic is offline  
post #11 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 2015, 01:47 PM
BCP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: London
Posts: 1,971
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
I wonder if the nerves at the Aussie were due to # being in the balance. Had Evert won it she would have more or less regained #1.
Exactly why it was such a disappointment. The fact that no.1 was on the line- Chris is meant to be the mentally tougher, but let the occasion get to her.

Pam, I loved that VSC SF between hana and Martina. I'd say that was in my top 3 matches of the year, with the US and French finals.

Also, the co no.1 seeding at Wimbeldon? So weird. If I was Martina, I would have been really miffed........

Last edited by BCP; Jan 6th, 2015 at 02:20 PM.
BCP is offline  
post #12 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 11th, 2015, 10:31 AM
Senior Member
 
louloubelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 4,861
                     
Re: 1985

From an Aussie perspective it was great that Dianne Balestrat really started to make some strides in 1985 from her comeback. She really should have beaten Mandlikova at Wimbledon leading in the 3rd set, who subsequently lost to Liz Smylie the next round.

Wendy Turnbull starting the AO with two double bagels, then losing to her nemesis Mandlikova.

The Hana and Martina match was amazing. Hana losing that 5-0 lead in the first set, basically losing 12 out of the next 15 games and still winning. Looking at the youtube footage, the one amazing point deep in the 3rd where Martina thought she hit a winner, celebrated and then had to stop the celebration when Hana somehow got the ball back, in which the unprepared Martina then closed out the point with a great winner herself.

Hopefully the US arrange for Hana to be there at the 30th anniversary.

There's more to life than just being happy.
louloubelle is offline  
post #13 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 11th, 2015, 08:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,551
                     
Re: 1985

Hana was the only player out there who could beat Martina at her game. I realize that there were major differences between the two, but I was glued to the set watching Hana at the USO relentlessly attack Martina and come out on top. Watching Hana at her best was some of the most entertaining tennis ever. That USO had breathtaking points.

PreacherFan
preacherfan is offline  
post #14 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2015, 06:59 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 576
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms. Anthropic View Post
Kathy Horvath's official tennis career earnings were $220,905. Likely she was not pulling in much endorsement money or appearance fees. Currently, the median yearly salary for a neurosurgeon in the U.S. is about $350,000. Horvath will be 50 years old this year, so she would still have had a few more good years left in her career if she had taken the surgeon route. You do the math.
Hi,

I am not sure that Kathleen Horvath's CAREER earnings were only $220K. She won over $100,000 in 1983 and 1984. And she played into the late 1980s. So I would assume her career earnings probably came in close to if not more than $400K.
DennisFitz is offline  
post #15 of 49 (permalink) Old Jan 26th, 2015, 08:16 PM
Senior Member
 
Ms. Anthropic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 9,514
                     
Re: 1985

Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisFitz View Post
Hi,

I am not sure that Kathleen Horvath's CAREER earnings were only $220K. She won over $100,000 in 1983 and 1984. And she played into the late 1980s. So I would assume her career earnings probably came in close to if not more than $400K.
All the official sites claim $220K, which doesn't mean much -- this is the WTA we're talking about here. But after 1984 she had lots of first or second round losses, even at the smaller tournaments. How much could she have been making losing in the first round of Oklahoma City in 1988? The WTA says $750. $26402 for singles and $14247 for doubles in 1988 is not taking advantage of the growth in prize money. And even if she earned $500K in her career, it still doesn't compare well with what she could have made as a neurosurgeon.
Ms. Anthropic is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TennisForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome