Equalizing the Surfaces - Has it been good for the game? - Page 2 - TennisForum.com
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old Oct 5th, 2013, 02:43 AM
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Re: Equalizing the Surfaces - Has it been good for the game?

As for McEnroe taking a French on todays courts, McEnroe wouldnt in a million years beat Nadal on any type of clay, and he had only one year he played well on clay anyway- 1984.
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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old Oct 6th, 2013, 01:50 PM
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Re: Equalizing the Surfaces - Has it been good for the game?

Originally Posted by dwyerfan View Post
I am not sure Lendl would have won a Wimbledon title on todays courts. I would see Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, and Murray all being too much for him from the baseline, and his serve and volley game was never natural or finely tuned. Either way that doesnt really do anything to prove or disprove your point which would be a baseliner having a better shot, which in Lendl's case would be true even if a group of superior baseliners in this time would have likely prevented it regardless.
I took the original premise to mean, for example, Lendl would have won Wimbledon versus the competition at the time if the grass had played like it does now. And while I could see Lendl beating, say, Cash with the current court conditions, the biggest thing to consider is that Cash himself (and the other dedicated net-rushers) would play differently if the attempt to homogenize the surfaces had been in effect. Unless we're talking about they happened to spring the change on the players rather quickly from 1986 to 1987.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old Oct 23rd, 2013, 02:16 PM
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Re: Equalizing the Surfaces - Has it been good for the game?

I think the new racquet and (especially so) string technologies have had a huge impact. With the equipment so powerful (and forgiving) all-court tennis (forget about S&V) is redundant - it's easier to stay on the baseline, regardless of surface, so the powers that be have gone with the flow and slowed down the surfaces to compliment the power baseline style. The courts during Wimbledon indicate just how much the game has changed in 10-15 years - no scuffed baseline, no scuffed service line; just a bare strip the length of the baseline, about a metre behind it.
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