Biographies of Female Tennis Players - Page 76 - TennisForum.com

 4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1126 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEGENDRE, ETHELYN (Ethelyn Legendre)
United States
Born 25 March 1894 in New Orleans
Died 05 November 1952 in New Orleans
Married Charles Edward Dunbar (1888-1959) on 06 June 1925
Active circa 1914 to 1923

Southern Champion in 1914,1916, 1920-1922. She was also RU in 1923
Ranked #1 in the Southern for most of 1910s and early 1920s.

Sons Charles E. Dunbar, III (1926–1995),[4] and George Bauer Dunbar (born ca. 1928)

This is part of an obituary of Ethelyn Legendre Dunbar printed in the "Times Picayune" newspaper on 6 November 1952:

"Mrs Charles E. Dunbar, Jr., women's civic leader, ardent worker in the cause of good government and member of a socially prominent family, died at her home, 1323 First, shortly after noon Wednesday, following a lengthy illness.

"[...] She was the wife of Charles E. Dunbar, attorney and leader in the movement for Louisiana Civil Service. Mrs Dunbar was born and raised in New Orleans. She was the former Ethelyn Legendre, daughter of the late [Émile Legendre and Mamie Kirk Folwell]. She attended Newcomb College, where she was a member of the Pi Beta Phi sorority. As a young woman, she was Southern tennis champion.

"She had long taken an interest in clean, honest government, and she maintained this interest actively until the time of her illness. When the Honest Election League was organized just prior to the 1939 gubernatorial campaign, Mrs Dunbar was an active league worker. During the campaign, she also headed a group of women workers in the 14th ward. Later, she became a very active member of the Independent Women's Organization, a group pledged to the cause of good government.

"She served as secretary of the women's committee which helped raise funds for the erection of one of the larger additions to Touro Infirmary. She was a member of a charity hospital committee, appointed by Governor Sam Jones to make recommendations in line with the newest hospital practices. Mrs Dunbar was also active in many phases of Red Cross work. Friends also recalled that she was a devout Catholic, attending mass frequently on work days..."



[Thanks to Newmark for this information]

Last edited by Rollo; Jun 6th, 2015 at 11:11 AM.
LKK is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #1127 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEGGE, ROBYN (Robyn Rhona Legge)
New Zealand
Born 3 December 1950
Married Hunt
[active 1968-1974]

Robyn (and not Robin) represented her nation in the Federation Cup in 1970, 1972, and 1974. Her trip abroad in 1970 also included Wimbledon, her only time at the Championships.

Now goes by the name Robyn Legge-Hunt. Still active in seniors tennis in New Zealand as of 2013, and has been coaching at the Waimairi Club in Canterbury since the 2011 Christchurch earthquake destroyed her 2 tennis centres there.

Her maiden and married names have been inverted. Her son Alistair Hunt, born 11.11.1972, was also a tennis player on the ATP tour.



Sources:

http://www.oldfriends.co.nz/Memories...2879595&page=1
http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/P...tair-Hunt.aspx

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/new...c6305ea913b3a2

Last edited by Rollo; Oct 2nd, 2014 at 12:35 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1128 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEGH, RUTH (Ruth Isabel Pennington-Legh)
United Kingdom
Born 25 August 1870 in Ryde, Isle of Wight
Died 09 January 1952 in Beaumaris, Isle of Anglesey
Married Edward Bluett Winch, 9 February 1899
[Active 1891-1922]

This is the "Miss P. Legh", who played under both her maiden and married names, becoming Ruth Winch after her marriage. Pennington was not her first name. Herbert Chipp mentions her as "Miss Pennington Legh" in his "Lawn Tennis Recollections" (1898).

From the "Cheshire Observer", 21 January 1899: "The marriage arranged between Edward Bluett Winch, third son of George Winch, Holcombe, Chatham and Ruth Isabel Legh only daughter of the late John Pennington-Legh, Norbury Booths, Knutsford, Cheshire, and Mrs Legh, Gladwyn, Branksome Park, Bournemouth will take place quietly at one o'clock on Thursday the 9th of February at Runstall Church, Tunbridge Wells."

Ruth came closest to a major in 1898 when she fought her way to the semifinals at Wimbledon. For reasons unknown she scratched to Louisa Martin. On 4 other occasions she found herself in the final 8 at Wimbledon.

Active on the Riviera 1903-1904, 1906-1910, and 1914. She won the Championships of Cannes in 1904. Later that year Ruth lost a tight Wimbledon quaterfinal to Alice Greene by the score of 6-4 6-4. 15 years years later she lost to Phyllis Satterthwaithe 6-3 6-4 at the same stage, quite a feat given she was 48 at the time!

An odd sidenote was capturing the bronze medal at the 1908 Olympics. Held that year in London at Wimbledom, the entry was paltry. In fact Ruth won the bronze without winning a match, getting spanked 6-1 6-1 by eventual gold medalist Dorothea Chambers in a 6-1 6-1 semifinal.

Her career spanned 4 decades and 31 years-one of the longest on record.

Wimbledon Record (entered 1891, 1893, 1898-1899,1901,1904, 1906,1908-1909,1919-1920, and 1922)

Singles: 12-10 and 2 defaults (SF 1898; QF in 1891, 1893, 1904 and 1919)
Mixed: 0-1

*Wimbledon has her under two separate entries.
*Though entered in 1922, Ruth defaulted in all 3 events.


Sources:

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/score...5e1/index.html
http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/score...666/index.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Winch (note it has her name as Ruth Joan, an error-The US Open information is also incorrect.)

Her photo is on page 74 of Alan Little's book, The Golden Days of Lawn Tennis on the French Riviera, 2014).

[Thanks to Mark for providing information for this biography]

Last edited by Rollo; Jan 2nd, 2015 at 04:23 AM.
LKK is offline  
post #1129 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEGORETTA, AURORA (Aurora Legoretta de Medellin)
Mexico
Born 30 June 1918
Died 03 September 2009
Married Diego Medellin Ocadiz, 1945

Dominated Mexican tennis from 1938-1945. Active as late as 1961. A widow of Medellin Ocadiz.

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:01 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1130 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:10 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEHANE, “JAN” (Janice Patricia Lehane)
Australia
Born 9 July 1941 in Glenfell, NSW, Australia
Married James John O’Neill, 19 February 1966
[Active 1957 to 1977]

The first top ten female to have a two-handed backhand. She was coached by Vic Edwards-later famous as tghe coach of Evonne Goolagong.

Lehane won the Mixed doubles at the Australian in 1960 and 1961. She is best remembered for her two handed backhand, her four consecutive defeats in the finals at the Australian, and a series of injuries that stunted her potential.

The first final for the national title in 1960 was full of irony. Jan won the junior title by beating Margaret Smith in the final. The very next day she lost to Margaret in the women's final 7-5 6-2. This was probably her best shot at a Grand Slam singles. She lost in straight sets in all four finals to Margaret Smith, later Mrs Court.

Quote:
"Her serve was flat and no more than medium-paced, but she was instantly ready to attack her opponent's service return. She played with good concentration, determinedly covering the extra yards across the baseline that the two-handed shot imposed on her. Her double-handed backhand was not played as a solitary king-hit since her longer swinging forehand was equally as good".
Quote:
Posted by Gumnut49 I ballboyed for Jan Lehane at the Australian championships in 1961, and watched her play often. "Tenacious" was the word for her. Her game, as I recall, was really pretty similar to the double-handers we've seen in the past generation: fierce driving groundstrokes into the back corners of the court, not much variety or artistry, but quick on her feet, and as Adrian Quist said, played with a tigerish intensity. Against Margaret, though, that just wasn't enough. Margaret had such big weapons - that serve, superb volleys, and powerful, audacious groundstrokes - that she just blew Jan and pretty well everyone else off the court
Lehane tended to play her groundstrokes in a "cramped" manner-close to her body. Her big weaknesses were a poor volley and in handling short balls.

Funds raised by a adoring public allowed her to go abroad in 1960, while champion Margaret Smith stayed home. On a wet court at Beckenham she slipped an injured her ankle seriously. Impressive enough abroad to eventually reach 7 grand slam quarterfinals in the other majors, Lehane was unable to find a way to reach a semifinals outside of the Aussie. Her best chance may have been at the 1964 French, when German Helga Schultze upset her in the quarterfinals.

Ankle injuries in 1959 and 1961 were minor compared to a fall at Wimbledon in 1963. Lehane went over on her ankle vs Darene Hard and had to be carried off the court on a stretcher.

A cyst had formed on a knee cartilege and she had surgery to remove it in August of 1964 after playing in the German Championships. Miss Lehane defied doctor's advice and returned to tennis at the Manly Seaside event in January. It was a serious mistake, as Jan severely damaged the cartilage in her injured knee and needed a second operation. Aborted comebacks were the theme for most of the next two years. A bright sport was her marriage in 1966. Henceforth she was Mrs O'Neill.

Though her career was effectively over at the top level, Lehane carried on in the late 60s, but a world tour comeback in 1967 landed her in the top 20 instead of the top 10. She last entered the Aussie Open in 1977, almost 20 years after her first appearance there.

Grand Slam Singles results (4 finals and 8 quarterfinals)

Australian Open F (1960, 1961, 1962, 1963) and QF (1971)
French Open QF (1960, 1962, 1963, 1964)
Wimbledon QF (1962)
US Open QF (1960, 1961)

Grand Slam Doubles results

Australian Open F (1961, 1963)
French Open SF (1960, 1961, 1962)
Wimbledon F (1961)

Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results

Australian Open W (1960, 1961)

According to Andrew Tas she won 31 titles and was a finalist in 31 more.

Jan is on the right. Winning the Italian doubles with Lesley Turner in 1963





Sources:

Jane Lehane O'Neill - Underappreciated or Over-rated - TennisForum.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Lehane

[Thanks to Gee Tee for this information]


Last edited by Rollo; Jan 16th, 2016 at 05:13 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1131 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEMKE, ROMA
Australia (Victoria)
Married Mr Keith Williams in 1950

She played the 1950 Aussie under her maiden name.

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:05 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1132 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LENDLOVA, OLGA (nee Olga Jenistova)
Czechoslovakia
Born 2 August 1935
Married Jiri Lendl circa 1959

Mother of Czech star Ivan Lendl

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:06 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1133 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LENOS, I
Greece

Active in the 1930s. Usually #2 behind Phyllis Xylis

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:07 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1134 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEPOUTRE, ANJA
Netherlands
Born 23 May 1944
Married Piet Hein Ybema

Active in the 1960s.

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:07 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1135 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LERMITTE, VIOLET (Violet Hilary Lermitte)
United Kingdom
Born 1904 in Richmond, Surrey
Died ????
Married Francis Roy Seppings Cosens on 16 November 1932 in Saint George's Church, Hanover Square, London
[Active 1920s[

Daughter of Henry Rhodes Lermitte, stock exchange clerk (b. Hamilton, Canada) and Augusta Maud Lermitte (née Cottrell; b. London). Paternal grandfather and great-grandfather both born in England.

She does not appear in any main draws at Wimbledon.

Listed as "Violette" in one or two sources. Might have died outside the UK.

[Thanks to Newmark for this biography]

Last edited by Rollo; Oct 25th, 2014 at 10:41 AM.
LKK is offline  
post #1136 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEROY, GRACE (nee Grace Arnold Moore)
United States
Born 13 April 1887.
Died after 1947
Married Robert LeRoy (2 Feb 1885-7 September 1946) on 07 June 1911.

She was the child of lawyer/stockbroker Casimer de Rham Moore, who died in 1925, and Harriet Burgess Moore.

Married in her home to Robert LeRoy (Town and Country mentions the wedding). As far as I can tell from the 1920 and 1930 census the couple were childless-and no children are mentioned in Robert's obituary. Robert and her father both went to Columbia University. Casimir was a football star at Columbia, so perhaps Grace inherited some of his athletic ability.

Robert was a star tennis player, especially at the 1904 Olympics in St Loius.

Grace's father left a good sum of money to her and her sister Harriet F Moore. They are mentioned together as owners of a building in October of 1947.

As of yet I have been unable to obtain a date of death for Grace.

Active in 1920.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_LeRoy

[Thanks to Rollo fpr this information]

Last edited by Rollo; Apr 24th, 2016 at 02:40 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1137 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LESTER, PHYLLIS (Phyllis Irene Lester)
Australia (NSW)
Died 1969
Married Alfred R Fox in 1933

First entered the Aussie in 1925

Note spelling NOT “Lestor”.

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:10 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1138 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:11 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEVI, MAUD (nee Maud Rosembaum)
United States/Italy
Born 13 January 1902 in Chicago, Illinois
Died 03 May 1981 In New York City, New York
Married (1) Baron Giacomo Giorgio Levi 1927 in Paris, France-divorced, 1934
Married (2) H. Walter Blumenthal (1895-1969) in 1935
Name variants: Usually listed as Baroness Levi during 1st marriage.
[Active 1926-1940]

United States National SF (1930) and QF (1934).

An all around athlete; Maud won a medal at the 1922 Women's World Games in the shot put. As the daughter of a wealthy Jewish shoe manufacturer; Rosenbaum could afford to pursue her sporting interests.

In her youth she attended Oaksmere School in Mamaroneck, New York. It was here that she excelled in sports as diverse as baseball, basketball, tennis, and track.

in 1926 Maud was a finalist in Rome, losing to the world #1 Suzanne Lenglen.

There are clues she spent a good deal of time in France-for she participated in both the 1926 and 1927 French Championships. In 1927 Maud and Simone Amaury got to the semifinals in doubles. More significantly, her 1927 marriage to an Italian Baron was in Paris. Conventional notions of class and gender didn't hinder the Baroness, for she coached and prepared Italian women for the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam. In Italy she vied with Lucia Valerio as the Italian #1 from 1927 to 1934.

In 1930 Maud crossed the Atlantic to participate in her native Championships for the first time. Her assortment of extreme chop shots and slices got her to the semifinals at Forest Hills. Her run was finally ended by Anna Harper 6-2 6-3. She was the first Italian National (albeit by marriage) to reach the semi of a Grand Slam. Four years later the Baroness was a Quarterfinalist at Forest Hills, upsetting Betty Nuthall along with way.

After her divorce she took up permanent residence in the United States. Quickly remarried, as Mrs. Blumenthal she accused the USLTA of "deliberately discriminated against" her for not seeding her at Forest Hills. She had a valid point, as the USTA ranked her #5 in 1934! Her argument made no headway. She drew #1 seed Helen Jacobs early on and lost in straight sets.

Now into her mid 30s in age, the quality of her results declined as the decade wore on.

Titles:

1927-29: Italian Champion
1931: White Sulphur Springs
1933: New York State, New Jersey State, and Eastern Singles
1935: Jackson Heights

[New York Times Obituary]

Maud Blumenthal, Tennis Player Who Won Many Titles in 1930's
Published: May 5, 1981

Maud Blumenthal, a top-ranking tennis player of the 1930's, died Sunday at her home at 200 East 72d Street. She was 79 years old.

A native of Chicago and the daughter of a wealthy shoe manufacturer, Emmanual Rosenbaum, Mrs. Blumenthal was educated in the United States and Europe. In the mid-1920's she began competing in tournaments in Italy as Baroness Giacomo Giorgio Levi, using the name of her first husband. She won the Italian title four times and was active in other sports, coaching teams in basketball, track and hockey for Olympic competition.

Returning to the United States in 1930, she became a leading player on the tennis circuit. She won the New York State clay-court championship several times and the Eastern title. In 1935, she was married to H. Walter Blumenthal, a New York stockbroker.

Mrs. Blumenthal is survived by a daughter, Nina Sweeney of Philadelphia.

1927 in Paris with doubles partner Simone Amaury. Maud is on the left. They reached the semifinals.




1933





Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_Rosenbaum

[Her New York Times Obituary]
http://www.nytimes.com/1981/05/05/sp...in-1930-s.html

[A wonderful piece in Italian]
http://oktennis.it/atp/37-fidecaro-c...-antenata.html

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 9th, 2016 at 01:46 AM.
LKK is offline  
post #1139 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:12 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEVINE, DOROTHY (nee Dorothy Watman)
United States
Born circa 1930 in Chicago
Married (1) Levine between 1949 and 1951 (died after 14 years of marriage)
Married (2) Sidney Kohl in 1968

Levine was ranked No. 11 in the U.S. in singles in 1953. She won both the singles and doubles U.S. indoor championships in 1954 and 1957.

[from the Palm Beach Daily news Monday, Nov. 19, 2012]

Former tennis champ entering USTA Midwest Hall of Fame
Dorothy Kohl was 'one of the top U.S. female tennis players in the 1950s.’


By Linda Marx

Dorothy Watman Levine Kohl was 12 years old the first time she lifted a tennis racket.

It was a warm Chicago day in the summer of 1942, and she and three pals were looking for something to do. They gathered rackets and balls and made their way to a public park.

Although Kohl was athletic and played basketball, baseball, volleyball and table tennis, she didn’t have a clue about tennis. One of four siblings, no one in her family played.

“It was during World War II, and I had never played tennis before, but after I watched others at the park in a nice rally, I knew I wanted to learn,” says Kohl, who was born and raised in Chicago and now lives in Palm Beach with her husband Sidney. “Little did I know that tennis would set me on the course of my life.”

After years of practice and perseverance, Kohl became one of the top U.S. female tennis players of the 1950s. She won the national indoor singles and doubles titles in 1954 and 1957. In 1954, she also played Wimbledon and the French Open during a three-month stay in Europe.

In 1953, she was ranked No. 1 in women’s singles in the Chicago District Tennis Association and No. 11 in the U.S. Tennis Association, then called the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association.

In 1947 and 1948, Kohl won the USTA/Midwest Section junior singles championship. And in 1946, she was ranked No. 1 nationally.

She will be recognized Dec. 1 at the Westin Hotel in downtown Indianapolis when she is inducted into the 2012 USTA/Midwest Hall of Fame.

“As one of the top U.S. female tennis players in the 1950s, Dorothy is most deserving of this honor,” says Jonelle Smith, president of the USTA/Midwest Section.

Kohl is “thrilled” about the induction and has written an acceptance speech detailing her early struggles and love for the sport. As a lifelong competitive athlete committed to perfecting her game, this award means a lot.

“When I was struggling with tennis, I was lucky that I had competed in table tennis, which was good for eye and hand coordination, and jumping rope that made me fast on my feet and provided cardio,” she says. “I am so excited about being named to the Hall of Fame. It proves my self-motivation has paid off.”

Kohl remembers trekking to the tennis court every day after school during good weather in Chicago. At the time, there was no indoor facility, so in winter she played on handball courts, longing to be in California where she could play outside year-round.

“It was war time when things were rationed,” she recalls. “I couldn’t even buy tennis shoes, and the balls had no fuzz on them.”

But she made the best of her situation. Eventually, she met a strong player who told her she had the makings of a good player but advised changing her unorthodox swing.

In 1943, she booked a tennis lesson with a pro who changed her grip and taught her the proper forehand and backhand. “That summer, I really improved my game and began playing in local tournaments,” she says.

The next year, she entered the River Forest Tennis Open with kids from all over the country. But she lost in the first round, and felt terrible because the California girls played much better. Then, in 1945, Chicago got an indoor tennis facility, and Kohl was off and swinging. She did well on wood courts and also became a good indoor player.

“I was so committed and longed to be really good,” she says. “So when I played River Forest again, I defeated the girl 11-0 who had originally beat me!”

Kohl played tennis seven days a week, taking a street car to the courts and skipping college. She met her first husband on the tennis court. They had three daughters, Lori, Jana and Lisa.

After her husband died 14 years later, a tennis friend introduced her to Sidney Kohl.

They married in 1968, and she moved to Milwaukee, where he was president and chairman of the board of directors of his family business, Kohl’s food and department stores. They sold the business four years later.

“Sydney had two sons from a previous marriage and adopted my daughters, so while we raised our kids in Milwaukee, I played tennis for fun,” says Kohl.

In 1978, they moved to Palm Beach, where she could play tennis every day. Kohl maintained that pace until last year, when she decided to slow down and stick to fitness workouts with a trainer. She’s also active with yoga, golf and bridge.

Sidney had co-founded Alliant and is now chairman of the board of directors of the Florida corporation.

Together, they have been collecting art since 1970. Eight pieces from their collection of abstract expressionist works, offered for sale Tuesday at Sotheby’s, brought in $101.3 million. Included were works by Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Hans Hofmann and Arshile Gorky.

The Kohls support many charities. This season, Kohl and one of her daughters will co-chair the MorseLife event to support the Morse Geriatric Center. And for his work, Sydney recently won a United Way award.

Says Kohl, “Since Palm Beach is our community, we like to give back.”

And when she returns from her induction to the Hall of Fame, Kohl will again thank tennis for gifts with which she’s been blessed.


Last edited by Rollo; Apr 18th, 2015 at 07:03 PM.
LKK is offline  
post #1140 of 4126 (permalink) Old Mar 13th, 2013, 11:12 AM
country flag LKK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,108
                     
Re: Biographies of Female Tennis Players

LEWIN, AUDREY
Australia (Vic)

Victorian player of late 1930s. Maid of honor at Connie Coate’s wedding in 1940

Last edited by Rollo; Mar 13th, 2013 at 08:11 PM.
LKK is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TennisForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Image Verification
Please enter the six letters or digits that appear in the image opposite.

Registration Image

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome