Interesting Phrases/Expressions/Accents in other regions that speak your language! - TennisForum.com
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 04:10 AM Thread Starter
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Interesting Phrases/Expressions/Accents in other regions that speak your language!

Hehe I was just noticing how certain british posters were using terms like "Bloody this" and it got me thinking, what phrases do I, as an american, use everyday that seem strange or weird to someone in England? I know I find it funny that they call flashlights "torches" and elevators "lifts," and that seems amusing to me, but what about from the opposite perspective?

But then again, why limit it to English? I am taking Spanish in school, and the differences between the Spanish accent and the South American Accent and even the Caribbean Accent are huge. So basically, in this thread, discuss various accents and expressions from other speakers of your language that you find amusing, annoying, or interesting.

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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 04:33 AM
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I like some lingo me mum says since she grew up in South Africa

fuck.
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mboyle
But then again, why limit it to English? I am taking Spanish in school, and the differences between the Spanish accent and the South American Accent and even the Caribbean Accent are huge. So basically, in this thread, discuss various accents and expressions from other speakers of your language that you find amusing, annoying, or interesting.
not even the accent... cuban spanish and meixican spanish is almost an entirely different language.

and i think calling elevators lifts is sexy


....This is fucked up, fucked up....

This is your blind spot, blind spot.
It should be obvious, but it's not.

You cannot kickstart a dead horse
You just crush yourself and walk away
I don't care what the future holds
Cause I'm right here in your arms today
With your fingers you can touch me

I'll be your black swan, black swan
I'm for spare parts, broken up.




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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mboyle
I know I find it funny that they call flashlights "torches" and elevators "lifts," and that seems amusing to me, but what about from the opposite perspective?
The opposite perspective is "it's our bloody language, stop mangling it"
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 12:31 PM
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singaporeans and malaysians tend to end their sentences with "lah", "leh" or "lor"

A single flow'r he sent me, since we met./All tenderly his messenger he chose;
Deep-hearted, pure, with scented dew still wet - One perfect rose.
I knew the language of the floweret;/'My fragile leaves,' it said, 'his heart enclose.'
Love long has taken for his amulet/One perfect rose.
Why is it no one ever sent me yet/One perfect limousine, do you suppose?
Ah no, it's always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 02:02 PM
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In Serbian there are some big differences between regions, a person from Belgrade can hardly understand people (especially the older) from the south of the country.
And as for Spanish, try speaking Castillan with someone from Chile.

Last edited by Joana; Jan 5th, 2004 at 02:09 PM.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 02:44 PM
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People from the Netherlands Antilles or Surinam have a cool accent when speaking Dutch. Afrikaans is basically a rip off from Dutch with some incredibly funny words or expressions like "amperbroekie" (panties), which literally translates to "barely pants" .

And then of course there's people from the Netherlands who try their best to speak Dutch but often fail to do so.

*Hides*
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 03:03 PM
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who are these "certain English posters"?!

Alex, i agree 100% LMAO!
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 03:04 PM
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plus, even within the Caribbean you have difficulty understanding people from the different islands

my family is from Barbados so i can understand them really well...Jamaica isn't that far away, yet i struggle with them
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathan_crane
I always thought "faucet" was quite a weird word for tap. Sounds really painful if you ask me!! I have also heard some people here use the word "elevator" instead of lift.

Once when we were in America, I remember my Mum, putting on her 'don't mess with me voice,' asking one of the people in Disney World, "Excuse me, could you tell me where the toilets are??" Needless to say, the guy thought she was a complete weirdo.

And to end on a random note, slightly off-topic, I find German quite interesting because it is often very literal with its words. The best example is the word for diarrhoea, which is "Durchfall" - literally "though fall!!"
I'm from Australia and I say all the same things you do. What is wrong with saying toilet anyway? I think Americans are the only weird ones
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 04:52 PM
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I find Argentinian "Voseo" so funny and shocking, we aren't used to that here
Plus the use of "coger" (take) it changes hugely the meaning in Spanish and in Latin American Spanish

"Qui n'a connu
Douleur immense
N'aura qu'un aperçu
Du temps
"


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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 5th, 2004, 06:26 PM
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in italy any region (and any town) got his own language....

so, it is not only an accent matter, but properly about language

sometimes the tv does interview at the people who only speak hisown language (at south side mainly) and it needs subtitles to understand

anyway, most funny accent are from venice, bologna and tuscany (like roberto benigni)
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old Jan 6th, 2004, 12:37 AM
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Us English don't need to go to America to find people who wreck our beautiful language, we have some right here.
I live in Widnes, which as some of you Brits may know, is right in the middle of Cheshire, Manchester, Liverpool and Lancashire (who each have their own distinctive accents), and Widnes is a horrid amalgamation of those four.
We drop 't's from words, so 'later', becomes 'la'er', and 'bottle' becomes 'boh'ul'.
Also, Birminham has strange phrases (aswell as a strange accent).
Birminham don't have 'Toys R Us' they have 'Toys Am We', for example.
They don't say, 'he changed his mind', they say 'he altered his mind'.
Strange people!
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