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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 07:15 AM Thread Starter
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Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

I was told by a couple posters to make this thread as an offshoot to the Gun control thread, and I feel it's very necessary. While gun laws are extremely lax and in need of dramatic strengthening federally, the United States and, really, the world, is not in a healthy state and the issues far extend mass murders. But are a sign of a social problem.

Here are SEVERAL incidents that have occurred since the shootings in Connecticut or a little bit prior. This is many more blatant public-safety incidents than usual:

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/loc...ng-4122668.php
http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/20...er_report.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...n_2309425.html
http://www.kansascity.com/2012/12/16...cers-shot.html
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/12/02...uicide-attack/
http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?sec...bay&id=8922021
http://abcnews.go.com/US/oregon-mall...8#.UM7EC2-umMt
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories...MPLATE=DEFAULT
http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012...ck-school?lite


Now, I'm not going to pretend that crime isn't an issue. Every day. Every city. Worldwide. Crime exists. It's a function of life. Murders will happen. We'll never do away with all homicides.

But this is an epidemic and the sign of a society that is not healthy. And I do not feel eliminating guns will make people feel entirely safe. It's clear there is a major problem in American society with people who are angry, people who behave in irrational ways, individuals dealing with unresolved mental/emotional/personality illness, and people who snap and create chaos and seek to kill innocent people. It's a problem everywhere, however, and this thread isn't solely generalized to the US, but unfortunately, the US seems to have a major concern regarding the health of the individuals in our society.

We need to have a discussion. And we need to make changes and do something about these problems our society is facing so we can be a healthy society. We need to stop thinking that simply changing gun laws is the answer. And the world needs to stop trying to avoid discussing these issues that affect every single one of us solely because we haven't been personally affected.

What do people think? Floor is yours. Discuss anything you want. Just don't judge others before hearing them out.

Don't Wanna Be An American Idiot.
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

Read. Learn. Educate. This is why we cannot simply ignore the health of our children and adults.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...ef=mostpopular

'I Am Adam Lanza's Mother': A Mom's Perspective On The Mental Illness Conversation In America



Friday’s horrific national tragedy -- the murder of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut -- has ignited a new discussion on violence in America. In kitchens and coffee shops across the country, we tearfully debate the many faces of violence in America: gun culture, media violence, lack of mental health services, overt and covert wars abroad, religion, politics and the way we raise our children. Liza Long, a writer based in Boise, says it’s easy to talk about guns. But it’s time to talk about mental illness.

While every family's story of mental illness is different, and we may never know the whole of the Lanza's story, tales like this one need to be heard -- and families who live them deserve our help.

Three days before 20 year-old Adam Lanza killed his mother, then opened fire on a classroom full of Connecticut kindergartners, my 13-year old son Michael (name changed) missed his bus because he was wearing the wrong color pants.

“I can wear these pants,” he said, his tone increasingly belligerent, the black-hole pupils of his eyes swallowing the blue irises.

“They are navy blue,” I told him. “Your school’s dress code says black or khaki pants only.”

“They told me I could wear these,” he insisted. “You’re a stupid bitch. I can wear whatever pants I want to. This is America. I have rights!”

“You can’t wear whatever pants you want to,” I said, my tone affable, reasonable. “And you definitely cannot call me a stupid bitch. You’re grounded from electronics for the rest of the day. Now get in the car, and I will take you to school.”

I live with a son who is mentally ill. I love my son. But he terrifies me.

A few weeks ago, Michael pulled a knife and threatened to kill me and then himself after I asked him to return his overdue library books. His 7 and 9 year old siblings knew the safety plan -- they ran to the car and locked the doors before I even asked them to. I managed to get the knife from Michael, then methodically collected all the sharp objects in the house into a single Tupperware container that now travels with me. Through it all, he continued to scream insults at me and threaten to kill or hurt me.

That conflict ended with three burly police officers and a paramedic wrestling my son onto a gurney for an expensive ambulance ride to the local emergency room. The mental hospital didn’t have any beds that day, and Michael calmed down nicely in the ER, so they sent us home with a prescription for Zyprexa and a follow-up visit with a local pediatric psychiatrist.

We still don’t know what’s wrong with Michael. Autism spectrum, ADHD, Oppositional Defiant or Intermittent Explosive Disorder have all been tossed around at various meetings with probation officers and social workers and counselors and teachers and school administrators. He’s been on a slew of antipsychotic and mood altering pharmaceuticals, a Russian novel of behavioral plans. Nothing seems to work.

At the start of seventh grade, Michael was accepted to an accelerated program for highly gifted math and science students. His IQ is off the charts. When he’s in a good mood, he will gladly bend your ear on subjects ranging from Greek mythology to the differences between Einsteinian and Newtonian physics to Doctor Who. He’s in a good mood most of the time. But when he’s not, watch out. And it’s impossible to predict what will set him off.

Several weeks into his new junior high school, Michael began exhibiting increasingly odd and threatening behaviors at school. We decided to transfer him to the district’s most restrictive behavioral program, a contained school environment where children who can’t function in normal classrooms can access their right to free public babysitting from 7:30-1:50 Monday through Friday until they turn 18.

The morning of the pants incident, Michael continued to argue with me on the drive. He would occasionally apologize and seem remorseful. Right before we turned into his school parking lot, he said, “Look, Mom, I’m really sorry. Can I have video games back today?”

“No way,” I told him. “You cannot act the way you acted this morning and think you can get your electronic privileges back that quickly.”

His face turned cold, and his eyes were full of calculated rage. “Then I’m going to kill myself,” he said. “I’m going to jump out of this car right now and kill myself.”

That was it. After the knife incident, I told him that if he ever said those words again, I would take him straight to the mental hospital, no ifs, ands, or buts. I did not respond, except to pull the car into the opposite lane, turning left instead of right.
“Where are you taking me?” he said, suddenly worried. “Where are we going?”

“You know where we are going,” I replied.

“No! You can’t do that to me! You’re sending me to hell! You’re sending me straight to hell!”

I pulled up in front of the hospital, frantically waiving for one of the clinicians who happened to be standing outside. “Call the police,” I said. “Hurry.”

Michael was in a full-blown fit by then, screaming and hitting. I hugged him close so he couldn’t escape from the car. He bit me several times and repeatedly jabbed his elbows into my rib cage. I’m still stronger than he is, but I won’t be for much longer.
The police came quickly and carried my son screaming and kicking into the bowels of the hospital. I started to shake, and tears filled my eyes as I filled out the paperwork -- “Were there any difficulties with… at what age did your child… were there any problems with.. has your child ever experienced.. does your child have…”

At least we have health insurance now. I recently accepted a position with a local college, giving up my freelance career because when you have a kid like this, you need benefits. You’ll do anything for benefits. No individual insurance plan will cover this kind of thing.

For days, my son insisted that I was lying -- that I made the whole thing up so that I could get rid of him. The first day, when I called to check up on him, he said, “I hate you. And I’m going to get my revenge as soon as I get out of here.”

By day three, he was my calm, sweet boy again, all apologies and promises to get better. I’ve heard those promises for years. I don’t believe them anymore.

On the intake form, under the question, “What are your expectations for treatment?” I wrote, “I need help.”

And I do. This problem is too big for me to handle on my own. Sometimes there are no good options. So you just pray for grace and trust that in hindsight, it will all make sense.

I am sharing this story because I am Adam Lanza’s mother. I am Dylan Klebold’s and Eric Harris’s mother. I am James Holmes’s mother. I am Jared Loughner’s mother. I am Seung-Hui Cho’s mother. And these boys—and their mothers—need help. In the wake of another horrific national tragedy, it’s easy to talk about guns. But it’s time to talk about mental illness.

According to Mother Jones, since 1982, 61 mass murders involving firearms have occurred throughout the country. Of these, 43 of the killers were white males, and only one was a woman. Mother Jones focused on whether the killers obtained their guns legally (most did). But this highly visible sign of mental illness should lead us to consider how many people in the U.S. live in fear, like I do.

When I asked my son’s social worker about my options, he said that the only thing I could do was to get Michael charged with a crime. “If he’s back in the system, they’ll create a paper trail,” he said. “That’s the only way you’re ever going to get anything done. No one will pay attention to you unless you’ve got charges.”

I don’t believe my son belongs in jail. The chaotic environment exacerbates Michael’s sensitivity to sensory stimuli and doesn’t deal with the underlying pathology. But it seems like the United States is using prison as the solution of choice for mentally ill people. According to Human Rights Watch, the number of mentally ill inmates in U.S. prisons quadrupled from 2000 to 2006, and it continues to rise -- in fact, the rate of inmate mental illness is five times greater (56 percent) than in the non-incarcerated population.

With state-run treatment centers and hospitals shuttered, prison is now the last resort for the mentally ill -- Rikers Island, the LA County Jail and Cook County Jail in Illinois housed the nation’s largest treatment centers in 2011.

No one wants to send a 13-year old genius who loves Harry Potter and his snuggle animal collection to jail. But our society, with its stigma on mental illness and its broken healthcare system, does not provide us with other options. Then another tortured soul shoots up a fast food restaurant. A mall. A kindergarten classroom. And we wring our hands and say, “Something must be done.”

I agree that something must be done. It’s time for a meaningful, nation-wide conversation about mental health. That’s the only way our nation can ever truly heal.

God help me. God help Michael. God help us all.

Don't Wanna Be An American Idiot.
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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 04:20 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/12/...unman_ide.html

A man who fired on Birmingham police officers before he was shot to death early today was upset about his wife's care.

The man was ejected from St. Vincent's hospital about 8 p.m. sources tell Al.com. He returned about 4 a.m. and went up to the 5th floor where his wife was a patient.

Sources say he briefly took a security guard hostage but the guard escaped.

While in the hospital the second time, sources say the man talked about "meeting his maker."

When police arrived on the 5th floor, he opened fire. Two officers returned fire, killing the man.

One officer was shot but is recovering. Two employees were also shot. At least a dozen shots were fired in all.

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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/12/...ood_apart.html
http://blog.al.com/wire/2012/12/east...had_ak-47.html

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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 04:41 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

A large portion of these individuals who are committing these incidents are on drugs, or have been on drugs. This is the report from the mall shooting in Portland and the killer, Jake Roberts and what he was taking:

“Paroxetine (also known by the trade names Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin) is an antidepressant drug of the SSRI type. Paroxetine is used to treat major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder in adult outpatients… Discontinuing paroxetine is associated with a high risk of withdrawal syndrome… Among the common adverse effects associated with paroxetine treatment of depression and listed in the prescribing information, those with the greatest difference from placebo are nausea, somnolence, male genital disorders , asthenia, sweating, dizziness, insomnia, dry mouth, constipation , and tremor. Other side effects include high blood pressure, headache, agitation, weight gain, impaired memory and paresthesia, decreased fertility… CHMP also gave a warning to prescribers recommending close monitoring of adult patients at high risk of suicidal behaviour and/or suicidal thoughts. CHMP does not prohibit use of paroxetine with high risk adults but urges extreme caution.”

That's another issue that we fail to address. So many of these mass murderers, and people who are struggling with mental/emotional/psychological/etc. issues in general, are either on prescription pills, they are taking pills that haven't been prescribed and taking way too many of them, they are taking the wrong type of pills for their problems, they smoke weed or do hardcore drugs which tend to have the affect to increase feeling of depression.

The medical field loves to push pills on individuals without caring about the side-affects because they want money. The only way we're going to see real change is if those in positions of influence start caring more about human lives than money.

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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 06:38 PM
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

Healthcare crisis: not enough specialists for the poor

With months-long waits for Medi-Cal patients to see specialists, some turn to emergency rooms exactly what healthcare reform is banking on avoiding.


By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
December 15, 2012, 4:48 p.m.

The blurry vision began early last year. Roy Lawrence ignored it as long as he could. But after falling off a ladder at his construction job, he knew he had to see a doctor.

He went to a community health clinic in South Los Angeles, where doctors determined he had diabetes and cataracts. The clinic could manage his illness but referred him early this year to the county health system for eye surgery.

Nearly a year later, Lawrence, a Jamaican immigrant without insurance, still is waiting for the operation. His vision has deteriorated so much he is considered legally blind.
"I want to see again," he said. "I've been waiting a long time."

Lawrence, 49, and patients like him are posing a critical challenge for the planned overhaul of the nation's healthcare system. Federal officials are investing billions in community health centers like the To Help Everyone (T.H.E.) Clinic, where Lawrence's problem was diagnosed, with the hope that they can keep more patients out of high-cost emergency rooms.

But a dearth of specialists available to low-income patients presents one of the bigger hurdles facing the country as it tries to bring spiraling healthcare costs under control.

Doctors say meeting new government mandates to keep patients healthy and out of hospitals a linchpin in reducing medical spending will be virtually impossible without the ability to make timely patient appointments with specialists.

By the end of the decade, the nation will be short more than 46,000 surgeons and specialists, a nearly tenfold increase from 2010, according to the Assn. of American Medical Colleges.

Healthcare reform is expected to worsen the problem as more patients many with complex and deferred health needs become insured and seek specialized treatment.

Read the rest here:
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-me-...,5635001.story

The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted. Shakespeare

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway. Kent M. Keith
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

http://www.wkrn.com/story/20358041/c...s-via-facebook
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/...enger-gunfire/

Another threat of mass violence from a unhealthy young man, and a random attack on a couple by a Hispanic male in San Diego suburb.

The number of similar incidents have reported gone up after the Newtown shootings, as expected.

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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by HippityHop View Post
Healthcare crisis: not enough specialists for the poor

With months-long waits for Medi-Cal patients to see specialists, some turn to emergency rooms — exactly what healthcare reform is banking on avoiding.


By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
December 15, 2012, 4:48 p.m.

The blurry vision began early last year. Roy Lawrence ignored it as long as he could. But after falling off a ladder at his construction job, he knew he had to see a doctor.

He went to a community health clinic in South Los Angeles, where doctors determined he had diabetes and cataracts. The clinic could manage his illness but referred him early this year to the county health system for eye surgery.

Nearly a year later, Lawrence, a Jamaican immigrant without insurance, still is waiting for the operation. His vision has deteriorated so much he is considered legally blind.
"I want to see again," he said. "I've been waiting a long time."

Lawrence, 49, and patients like him are posing a critical challenge for the planned overhaul of the nation's healthcare system. Federal officials are investing billions in community health centers like the To Help Everyone (T.H.E.) Clinic, where Lawrence's problem was diagnosed, with the hope that they can keep more patients out of high-cost emergency rooms.

But a dearth of specialists available to low-income patients presents one of the bigger hurdles facing the country as it tries to bring spiraling healthcare costs under control.

Doctors say meeting new government mandates to keep patients healthy and out of hospitals — a linchpin in reducing medical spending — will be virtually impossible without the ability to make timely patient appointments with specialists.

By the end of the decade, the nation will be short more than 46,000 surgeons and specialists, a nearly tenfold increase from 2010, according to the Assn. of American Medical Colleges.

Healthcare reform is expected to worsen the problem as more patients — many with complex and deferred health needs — become insured and seek specialized treatment.

Read the rest here:
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-me-...,5635001.story
So tragic. No surprise, though. This is yet another representation of how those in the medical/health field always put money first over the care of citizens...........they make no money off of the poor, so they don't care about treating them. And the unacceptable resources in general in the health industry makes things doubly tough. Not enough resources, not enough money to go around. Not enough education.

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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 07:04 PM
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

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Originally Posted by Flavia P. View Post
So tragic. No surprise, though. This is yet another representation of how those in the medical/health field always put money first over the care of citizens...........they make no money off of the poor, so they don't care about treating them. And the unacceptable resources in general in the health industry makes things doubly tough. Not enough resources, not enough money to go around. Not enough education.
While I agree with you that this is tragic, I think that you are being unfair to health care providers. Medical providers come out of school with tremendous amounts of debt.

If they are not being reimbursed at least at the cost of their service what are they to do? They have bills like everybody else. Their office staff has to be paid. The water, electricity, gas etc. has to be kept on.

And like everybody else they have to eat and have a roof over their heads. Nobody can run a business at less than their costs. If they do, they won't be in business for long.

The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted. Shakespeare

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway. Kent M. Keith
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

Honestly, it's not about being unfair, it's about not ignoring people who have illness. I understand that health care providers do have lives of their own and mouths to feed, themselves and their families. The system is the issue, not necessarily the health care providers. BUT the truth many health care providers treat poor people, they treat people with specialized physical and psychological damage, like trash. State run hospices are very corrupt often. Patients are often just drugged up. People with mental illness are often just not treated at all, and just locked up like criminals. And then given drugs.

Drugs are pushed because drugs=money. Actual care is not being pushed on the level it should be because there is less money to be made. It's very corrupt.

A lot of these institutions have been forced to close due to the lack of funding and high costs. That leaves fewer opportunities for people to seek and attain help. Of course, those with money in the waiting line for care get first, second and third priority. But what we're seeing is that these poor individuals become homeless. If they're given help, they cannot pay their bills and lose their homes. They cannot work and they lose their jobs.

The system is completely and utterly shambled and has been for about 30 years. We need financial reform as well as tax reform, along with a complete overhaul of the health care system in our country. It needs to be significantly less expensive to seek care and it needs to be significantly less damaging to hospices to give it.

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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

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Honestly, it's not about being unfair, it's about not ignoring people who have illness. I understand that health care providers do have lives of their own and mouths to feed, themselves and their families. The system is the issue, not necessarily the health care providers. BUT the truth many health care providers treat poor people, they treat people with specialized physical and psychological damage, like trash. State run hospices are very corrupt often. Patients are often just drugged up. People with mental illness are often just not treated at all, and just locked up like criminals. And then given drugs.

Drugs are pushed because drugs=money. Actual care is not being pushed on the level it should be because there is less money to be made. It's very corrupt.

A lot of these institutions have been forced to close due to the lack of funding and high costs. That leaves fewer opportunities for people to seek and attain help. Of course, those with money in the waiting line for care get first, second and third priority. But what we're seeing is that these poor individuals become homeless. If they're given help, they cannot pay their bills and lose their homes. They cannot work and they lose their jobs.

The system is completely and utterly shambled and has been for about 30 years. We need financial reform as well as tax reform, along with a complete overhaul of the health care system in our country. It needs to be significantly less expensive to seek care and it needs to be significantly less damaging to hospices to give it.
I feel like we're talking a cross purposes here. That's easy to do on a message board. I thought that you were talking about the article that I posted which has less to do with mental health than physical health. I posted it because the title of your thread included the term physical. If this is to focus only on mental health maybe the title of the thread should be modified.

The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted. Shakespeare

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway. Kent M. Keith
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post #12 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

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I feel like we're talking a cross purposes here. That's easy to do on a message board. I thought that you were talking about the article that I posted which has less to do with mental health than physical health. I posted it because the title of your thread included the term physical. If this is to focus only on mental health maybe the title of the thread should be modified.
It's just a thread about health in general. The healthcare industry in general. I was discussing that LA Times article, BTW

I was speaking more in generalities. The health care industry in general, physical/mental, whatever the individual case may be, is a very corrupt industry.

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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)



This world
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post #14 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 08:03 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

http://www.heavy.com/regions/2012/12...ntary-schools/
http://www.boston.com/metrodesk/2012...MgJ/story.html

Yet two more incidents regarding threats to schools. When will we wake up and realize what the biggest issue is. These threats may not be legitimate but they are done to cause fear, and they are done because these people are crying for attention. It's going to continue occurring. We need answers.

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post #15 of 31 (permalink) Old Dec 17th, 2012, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Health thread (mental, psychological, societal, emotional, physical, etc.)

Wash. man arrested after Facebook threat to 'shoot up' schools

http://www.kval.com/news/Wash-man-ar...?m=y&smobile=y
SEDRO-WOOLLEY, Wash. - Police have arrested a 19-year-old Skagit County man who threatened on Facebook to "shoot up every school within a 100-mile radius" if his gun rights were taken away after the Connecticut school massacre.

Authorities had been looking for the man, identified as Korry Martinson, 19, since Friday at about 7:20 p.m., after he allegedly posted the threat on his Facebook page, police said.

The threat was seen by several people, who reported it to the Sedro-Woolley police and the Skagit County Sheriff's Office.

Martinson's mother also was contacted by several callers. When she confronted her son about the posting, he got into an argument with her and took off before police arrived at his home.

Authorities had been looking for him ever since, and the FBI was monitoring the case, said Lt. Lin Tucker of the Sedro-Woolley Police Department.

Martinson finally turned himself in on Sunday afternoon, when a friend brought him to the Sedro-Woolley police station. He was placed under arrest and booked into the Skagit County Jail for investigation felony harassment.

A screenshot of the Facebook threat allegedly posted by Martinson said:

"Okay, so about that shooting of the little kids.

"I would personally like to thank the man who did this. You will (be) looked u pon as a hero in my eyes. You have rid the world of 20 future s------- and w-----.

"I say good riddance, and that we need more people like you. It's the government's fault as to why these things happen.

"If this causes our gun laws to be taken away, to the point as to where I cannot own a gun, I will personally get my sawed off double barreled shotgun and my AK-47 and go shoot up every school within a 100-mile radius of my current location."

Lt. Tucker said the threats shook up many people in the community.

"I've got our superintendent of the Sedro-Woolley School District talking to my boss, wondering, 'Well, should we lock down the schools? ... What should we do for school tomorrow?' I've got the director of security for Skagit Valley College asking the same questions," Tucker told KOMO Newsradio.

Tucker said it's not clear whether Martinson actually owns any guns, and he had no criminal record before making the Facebook threat.

"He's been described as, he likes to stir the pot, get people riled up, his friends said. I don't think he realized how much he was going to stir people up," Tucker said.

"I don't think he understands the can of worms he opened up. You hate to see somebody's life ruined this way, but I also hate to have a bunch of people worrying about sending their kids to school."

Martinson is scheduled to make an initial court appearance Monday in Skagit County Superior Court.

Don't Wanna Be An American Idiot.
Flavia P. is offline  
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