Ukraine leader threatens parliament dissolution - TennisForum.com
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 01:02 PM Thread Starter
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Ukraine leader threatens parliament dissolution

By Olena Horodetska



KIEV (Reuters) - Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko held marathon talks on a coalition government with his political rival on Tuesday after threatening to dissolve parliament to try to force concessions from him.

Analysts said Yushchenko wanted pro-Moscow Viktor Yanukovich to commit himself to Western-leaning policies such as seeking membership of NATO and the European Union in exchange for the president agreeing to Yanukovich becoming prime minister.

Before going into talks with Yanukovich, whom he humiliated in a 2004 election, Yushchenko said he would begin procedures for dissolving parliament because it faced a crisis.

"It could be solved in two ways; it's either a search for compromise ... or dissolution of parliament," Yushchenko's spokeswoman Iryna Gerashchenko told reporters.

She said the president hoped talks with Yanukovich, and round-table negotiations between all political groups, could defuse the situation.

Yanukovich's Regions party won most votes in parliamentary polls in March in which Yushchenko's Our Ukraine party trailed a poor third.

"We still think a deal between Our Ukraine and Regions is likely," said Tim Ash, emerging markets economist at Bear Stearns investment bank in a research report. "Yushchenko is probably bluffing over early elections."

Yushchenko has until the end of Wednesday to make up his mind about Yanukovich's nomination as prime minister. It is not clear in the constitution if he has the right to reject him and what consequences there could be if he did so.

PAST HUMILIATION

They held talks for more than eight hours on Tuesday, and Gerashchenko told reporters closed doors talks would continue through the night with a final decision expected on Wednesday.

"Today we will have only a meeting of the working group. It is most likely that the round table is an issue for tomorrow."

Dissolving parliament would mean new elections, a prospect financial markets are unlikely to welcome after four months of political uncertainty.

Some analysts say that if Yanukovich became prime minister on his own terms, Yushchenko would be a lame duck president and would therefore have little to lose by calling new elections.

If Yushchenko disbanded parliament, it could spark a standoff with the opposition majority in the chamber. They have said a dissolution would be illegal and they would ignore it.

Yanukovich's party says it is not prepared to make concessions to Yushchenko on NATO or -- another divisive issue -- on the status of the Ukrainian language.

Yushchenko humiliated Yanukovich in 2004 by winning the re-run of a presidential election that had been rigged in his rival's favour. But his Orange Revolution has spluttered. There are signs Yushchenko may be trying to conclude an electoral pact with his estranged ally Yulia Tymoshenko, which would change the electoral calculations.

var year = new Date() document.write('© Reuters ' + year.getFullYear() + ". All Rights Reserved." ); © Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.


http://go.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle....s/uk/worldNews
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 01:12 PM
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So much for the orange revolution
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by spudrsca
So much for the orange revolution
The Orange revolution was about having democracy and not for their leaders to be forever in power. If they suck they should be voted out. The revolution lives on.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Lord Nelson
The Orange revolution was about having democracy and not for their leaders to be forever in power. If they suck they should be voted out. The revolution lives on.
More about using democratic ideals to achieve western interests in Ukraine. Less about the Ukraine.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Lord Nelson
The Orange revolution was about having democracy and not for their leaders to be forever in power. If they suck they should be voted out. The revolution lives on.
Well if you believe that.
I would say the orange revolution was to have a pro usa government and to have a nato base in Ukraine.
It was like the pathetic I don't know what colour revolution they tried in Belarus.
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by spudrsca
Well if you believe that.
I would say the orange revolution was to have a pro usa government and to have a nato base in Ukraine.
It was like the pathetic I don't know what colour revolution they tried in Belarus.
well in that case the situaltion remains unchanged. Ukraine has closer ties with Europe and U.S. then with Russia. Poland seems to have deepened its ties with Ukraine and Yuschenko is still in power. So then why are you pro Russian people celebrating???

By the way I am also pro Russian. I support them over their struggle to contain the chechens who receve arab money and support.

Last edited by Lord Nelson; Aug 2nd, 2006 at 02:15 PM.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Warrior
More about using democratic ideals to achieve western interests in Ukraine. Less about the Ukraine.

the beauty of it is, Western interests also coincide with Ukraine's interests.

The Orange Revolution is alive and well. Yuschenko and Tymoshenko won the election by a comfortable margin, but Yuschenko disagrees with Tymoshenko on economic policy. Yanukovich's party is actually better on economics and that's why Yuschenko prefers them as a coalition partner. Yanukovich is not "pro-Moscow" either. He is pro- his own region in Eastern Ukraine, which is not the same as pro-Moscow.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 03:51 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by vogus
the beauty of it is, Western interests also coincide with Ukraine's interests.

The Orange Revolution is alive and well. Yuschenko and Tymoshenko won the election by a comfortable margin, but Yuschenko disagrees with Tymoshenko on economic policy. Yanukovich's party is actually better on economics and that's why Yuschenko prefers them as a coalition partner. Yanukovich is not "pro-Moscow" either. He is pro- his own region in Eastern Ukraine, which is not the same as pro-Moscow.
Yeah you really know what Ukraine needs! Yuschenko refuses to make Russian a second language, despite the fact that more than half of the nation speaks Russian. That doesn't sound very democratic to me. Also more than 60% of Ukrainians oppose joining NATO and only 16% support it.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Warrior
Yeah you really know what Ukraine needs! Yuschenko refuses to make Russian a second language, despite the fact that more than half of the nation speaks Russian. That doesn't sound very democratic to me. Also more than 60% of Ukrainians oppose joining NATO and only 16% support it.

maybe i do know, wise guy.

the issue is not about having Russian as a second language. The issue is that some of the Russian-speakers don't want any Ukrainian language at all in Ukraine, they only want Russian like it was during the Soviet times. But Yuschenko isn't having any of that bullshit. And the majority of Ukrainians voted for him, exactly because of that.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by vogus
maybe i do know, wise guy.

the issue is not about having Russian as a second language. The issue is that some of the Russian-speakers don't want any Ukrainian language at all in Ukraine, they only want Russian like it was during the Soviet times. But Yuschenko isn't having any of that bullshit. And the majority of Ukrainians voted for him, exactly because of that.
India and Belguim are bilingual nations and they're doing just fine. Why can't Ukraine be like that?
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 11:11 PM
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India and Belguim are bilingual nations and they're doing just fine. Why can't Ukraine be like that?

I suppose it will be like that. Ukraine is a bilingual country, and eventually they will have to let each region decide its own main language, like they do in Belgium and Switzerland. Ukraine also has the advantage of its two languages being mutually understandable with a minimum of study. So they should be able to work it out.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 3rd, 2006, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vogus
I suppose it will be like that. Ukraine is a bilingual country, and eventually they will have to let each region decide its own main language, like they do in Belgium and Switzerland. Ukraine also has the advantage of its two languages being mutually understandable with a minimum of study. So they should be able to work it out.
SUI is a rather Perplexing Place.

BEL has 2 currencies. (The Euro, and the completely undeserved wildcard).

Re. UKR, Yulia Tymoshenko is a genuine MILF, which should get her a "first round bye" in the voting. (Of course ITA's Alessandra Mussolini is too, and she's a Fascist).
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 3rd, 2006, 01:17 AM
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Is Yankutovich the Communist guy
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old Aug 3rd, 2006, 01:51 AM
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Originally Posted by *cory*
Is Yankutovich the Communist guy

he's not really communist but he is more communist than Yuschenko.
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