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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 07:44 PM Thread Starter
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Question about teaching jobs in Ireland/London/Scotland/Netherlands...please come in!

Hey,
Right now I'm in the midst of trying to plan to go to graduate school for education and start a career in education teaching High School english (age 14-18 roughly). I'm planning on doing this either in Ireland, Scotland, the UK, or the Netherlands and I just have a few questions for anybody with knowledge in this area.

1)How hard it is to find a teaching job in these areas, particularly in the big cities? In the US, you're pretty much going to find a job if you're willing to work in the poorer areas of major cities. Does the same thing apply to these countries?
2)Do you have to go to graduate school and get your degree in the country you want to teach in? In other words, could I get my degree in education in New York and then go over to London and start teaching?
3)How much do teachers generally get paid in these countries?
4)In the case of the Netherlands, are you required to know Dutch in order to teach there or are there solely English speaking schools?

Any help or advice with any of these questions would be great! Thanks
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 08:49 PM
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My advice. Don't become a teacher

Seriously though if you can't control a class of Y9 Y10 Y11's you will be eaten alive. I'm in Y10 and some teachers are seriously shit.

Can't help you with your questions
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilishAttitude
My advice. Don't become a teacher

Seriously though if you can't control a class of Y9 Y10 Y11's you will be eaten alive. I'm in Y10 and some teachers are seriously shit.

Can't help you with your questions

Maybe its because kids are stupid these days and dont give teachers credit and respect they deserve!

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 08:57 PM
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Im in year 11

I think with the idiots today in the younger years

i would reccomend aiming to teach into the 17-18 year range

Much easier to teach, and it gives you a lot of respect

Im not sure how hard it is to get a teaching Job in England, but im guessing, that you could apply for a teaching job, and i think they would let you observe other teachers doing their lessons, and on a few occasions, see how good your teaching skills are in your specialist subject.

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 09:24 PM
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Seriously, when I was in yr11 we were the worst year ever. Then every Year 11 after that became the worst year ever, because for most people, it's the last year of school. Seriously, I would become a Yr 7 -8 teacher (11-13 years) or even sixth form. With sixth form, the relationship between pupil and teacher is much closer. I stayed on at school and you began to see your old teachers in a different light. They treat you like an adult and are much easier to approach.

Whatever you do, Year 11 is a no no!!! However, if you teach at most secondary schools you will have to teach all years from year 7 to year 11.

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 09:26 PM
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People throw sandwiches at the teacher, they change their name on the board from Mrs Munstrer into 'Mrs Munter', they fight, they compare who can play the loudest ringtones, they run around, they 'happy slap' teachers.

I highly recommend teaching.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 09:32 PM
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England is prob your best bet as there are more teaching joba available there than in Ireland

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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old May 4th, 2005, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rightous
England is prob your best bet as there are more teaching joba available there than in Ireland
Yeah I would think its probably easiest in England than in Scotland, but then again our government has just launch a Desperate Talent (ooops, I mean 'Fresh Talent') Initiative recently, so migrant workers will stay and work in Scotland, so you may get extra incentives that way. In my small experience of English schools, I would say in my unbiased opinion that Scottish schools are superior, so you should go there!

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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 02:40 AM
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For England (High School is 11-18):

1) As in the US, there is a shortage of teachers in England. It depends what subject you are interested in teaching and where you are willing to teach though. English has been officially a shortage subject in the past, but I'm not sure if it is now (although qualified English teachers who can teach English with a sideline in special needs and 'English as a second or additional language' are always in demand), but I would imagine there are still jobs available, especially in London, although some of those jobs might be in schools that are a little "challenging".

2) I'm not sure about this one. I think your American qualification would be recognised as allowing you to teach, but only as what is called a non-qualified/temporary teacher. With that status, you can work for 4 years before you have to qualify or stop, but you don't get paid much with only that status and it can be harder to find a job. To become a qualified teacher you need to pass various assessments which you can do while you are working as a temporary teacher. Usually it takes a year of classroom teaching to pass those assessments, although you can fast-track through it if you have more experience. There's more info at:
http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/teachinginengland/ and http://www.teach.gov.uk/routes_into_...&content_id=37

3) The unqualified teacher's pay scale starts at approx £14,000 but individual schools can pay more at their discretion. The newly qualified teacher pay scale starts at around £19,000. If you work in London, you get a special allowance because the cost of living is so high, e.g. a newly qualified teacher would start on around £22,500. I think there are various bonuses and allowances too, depending on training, qualifications, experience, what subject you teach, etc.

Hope that helps & good luck!
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 03:48 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you so much for your help!


One last question...in the United States, you end up getting your masters in Education @ grad school if you want to teach at a public school, and you end up getting your masters in English @ grad school if you want to teach at a private school. Does the same thing apply in the UK?

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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 10:00 AM
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Bradshaw not that I am aware, private schools in the UK don't employ just masters teachers but I think the fact you are from a different country may bode well for you.

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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 10:33 AM
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If I wanted to teach English I would go somewhere exotic like Japan or some tropical island. But I guess that would be EFL as opposed to English for English.

By the way, if you are coming to the UK make sure you learn to spell the correct way before you come, or the other teachers will castrate you.
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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 11:24 AM
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About The Netherlands:

There are some schools, like IB schools or international schools, that are either bilingual or solely English-speaking. However, the vast majority of schools are Dutch-speaking and will require you to speak Dutch. I think it would be tough for you to get a job as an English tutor at a Dutch school, but I am sure there are possibilities.

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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 11:31 AM
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About the Netherlands [Part II]:

Sorry, overlooked the salary question.

Basically, your starting salary at a normal high school would be between US $2,700 and $2,800. The salary will be affected by your degree, what level of classes you will teach (the Dutch system is divided into several different levels; the higher the level, the more you will get paid) and the ages of the children you teach (if you teach students that are in their final years, you get paid more than if you pay kids that just joined high school). Basically, if you aim at teaching kids between 15-18, you will get paid more than if you pay younger pupils.

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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old May 5th, 2005, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradshaw#1
One last question...in the United States, you end up getting your masters in Education @ grad school if you want to teach at a public school, and you end up getting your masters in English @ grad school if you want to teach at a private school. Does the same thing apply in the UK?
Generally speaking, you need either a B.Ed or a PGCE (Postgrad Cert in Education) to teach in any school in the UK, i.e. a teaching qualification. So in your case the qualification similar British teachers have is B.Ed English or Secondary PGCE in English. It is theoretically possible to teach in an independent school (I think this is your private school, although we call them public schools in the UK - fee paying, etc) without one, but you would find it very difficult to find a job.

In your case, since you are from a different country, as rightous says, that might work in your favour if you have a Masters in English rather than a Masters in Education. Your options would still be limited though because the independent schools are not suffering a teaching shortage in the same way as state schools are, so it is generally much more difficult to find a job in them to begin with.
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