Shots: two-handed backhand - TennisForum.com
 
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 9th, 2006, 05:12 PM Thread Starter
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Shots: two-handed backhand

I think one of the key factor for a powerful two-hander is good shoulder rotation. That said, what’s your favourite feet alignment to hit this stroke ? Open or closed stance ? Moreover, the backswing is very important: as i prepare the racquet, my elbows are bent and they hug my body. This is going to create a longer and more powerful swing the if the arms were completely straight. In today’s game, the bent elbow is a widely used style, and in my opinion a good option.
What do you think about stance and backswing ?
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 9th, 2006, 05:23 PM
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 9th, 2006, 06:00 PM
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Good should rotation? That would mean that Andy Roddick has a good backhand

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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 9th, 2006, 09:17 PM
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Stance is very important. Open stance is better if you don't have as much time to set up. It's mostly arm and sometimes you can't get too much pop on it.

Closed stance is much better with the two-hander which means entering the shot stepping forward and to the left with your right foot (right hander) and following through the shot by stepping forward with your left foot.


Here's an open-stance backhand from Venus


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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 10th, 2006, 07:19 AM
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I think that the two handed backhand is a shot for babies and should be not allowed on the professional circuit.

There is nothing more unprofessional than seeing an untalented player bash the ball with not much skill with a shot that does not require much ability!

If you are on the professional circuit and can't hit a single handed backhand and forehand then maybe you shouldn't be playing on the Professional circuit!
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 11th, 2006, 01:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winghams
I think that the two handed backhand is a shot for babies and should be not allowed on the professional circuit.

There is nothing more unprofessional than seeing an untalented player bash the ball with not much skill with a shot that does not require much ability!

If you are on the professional circuit and can't hit a single handed backhand and forehand then maybe you shouldn't be playing on the Professional circuit!

You don't know what you're talking about

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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 11th, 2006, 02:03 AM
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such a great example of a powerful backhand, look at her approach and preparation...

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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 11th, 2006, 03:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyguydsl
Stance is very important. Open stance is better if you don't have as much time to set up. It's mostly arm and sometimes you can't get too much pop on it.

Closed stance is much better with the two-hander which means entering the shot stepping forward and to the left with your right foot (right hander) and following through the shot by stepping forward with your left foot.


Here's an open-stance backhand from Venus


perfect!!



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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 11th, 2006, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winghams
I think that the two handed backhand is a shot for babies and should be not allowed on the professional circuit.

There is nothing more unprofessional than seeing an untalented player bash the ball with not much skill with a shot that does not require much ability!

If you are on the professional circuit and can't hit a single handed backhand and forehand then maybe you shouldn't be playing on the Professional circuit!
crap

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 11th, 2006, 10:00 AM
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IMHO, the 2 handed backhand stems from the fact that most players started playing tennis when they were little, and for little kids it is always easier to pickup 2 handed backhand than 1 hander because the later requires a delicate balance between timing and position and other requirements to hit a good 1 hander. Along with the pace and power factor, this makes picking up 1 hander very difficult for kids. And I always admire those who could pick up a 1 hander when they were young. This is something which unless you are really talented, will be very hard to pick up from day 1. Contrarily, 2 handers are more lenient on timing and position, but you sacrifice reach for that. Furthermore, with 2 hander, it is easier to handle the pace and power in todays game.

Regarding the commment about 2 handers are baby shots and it is for untalented players. I don't think that is true because if they can play at the professional level which they play at (at least rating 6+), they have to have the skills (and/or maybe talent) in order to make it to that level. So we must not downplay their skills based on which form of backhand they choose.

Similarily, the same argument could go to 2 handed forehand players like Monica Seles and Peng Shuai.

IMHO, it is a matter of preference.
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 12th, 2006, 02:31 AM
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Dear Mr Chung,

If Shuai Peng is really so talented, how come she she can't get past the early rounds of a grand slam tournament?

And as for Monica Seles. She was a great tennis player but lacked alot of talent compared to Steffi Graf with her limited shot selection.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 12th, 2006, 04:24 AM
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But you can't dismiss the fact that some of the best rivalries in the 90's were between them (Seles vs. Graf) as pretty much agreed in the other thread. Although it is true that Monica Seles introduced the power factor into the game of tennis with her mighty two-handed play, by no mean was she just smacking the ball on the court. Furthermore, you are trying to get to your point by discarding the Grand Slams and tournaments that Seles have won over her career.

Talent my friend, can get you so far in your tennis career, people also said that Anna Kournikova have talent, but where is she now? Without determination and practice, talent will not get you anywhere. Furthermore, it all comes down to the survival of the fittest on the court, men or women. In the survival process, you do whatever that's necessary whether it's one-handed or two-handed. At the end, your opponent is not going to care about whether you have a one-handed or two-handed backhand (or forehand), all they care about is winning.

To me, tennis is an art form, it is an art of strategic style and execution, much like paying chess. While one-handed backhand does look beautiful when executed correctly, that doesn't mean it is beautiful in terms of strategic execution even for great strategists like Federer.

Shot selection wise, once again you do whatever you need. Ultimately, you are not trying to impress the crowd out there by hitting all these beautiful one-hander, you are to win. Greats like Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport have a lot of shot selections, but they have two-handed backhand, and Martina is agreed to have one of the best shot selections in the game.

One-handed backhand, in theory, doesn't necessary give you more edge over two-handed backhand other than the fact that you can reach further with one-hander. But with foot speed and correct footwork, you can make up most of that. (If there are any coaches out here, please correct me if I am wrong) In addition to that, one-hander can provide excellent top spin. But with two-handers, it can also provide enough top spin for control. Let's take Martina Hingis again for example, in her match against Maria Sharapova in the Tokyo Pan Pacific Open in February, she didn't need to reach much as her footwork and foot speed and even shot selection did most of the reach for her.

In conclusion, the choice between one-hander and two-hander is purely preference and needs. Your view on it is entirely in terms of being a fan. But if I were to put you out competing in the professional circuit, then you will realize soon after that one-hander or two-hander isn't that much different. Because at the end of the day, you either win or loose to a one-hander or two-hander, but you still win or you still lost. So I guess that doesn't make much of a difference.

Last edited by thomas.chung; Mar 12th, 2006 at 07:27 AM.
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 12th, 2006, 04:42 AM
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Back to the topic, I like Lindsay Davenport's backhand the most. Very accurate, very deadly and it is always spectacular when she got it lined up.
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old Mar 12th, 2006, 02:21 PM
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i love hitting my backhand - I look at Venus and hingis and davenports backhands and would rate them as each of there best shots - and they have no problem with placement power up the line cross court etc

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