Would you let your daughter lose her chilhood for tennis? - TennisForum.com
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post #1 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 09:23 PM Thread Starter
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Would you let your daughter lose her chilhood for tennis?

It seems that alot of tennis players were made to practise, all day, every day. I think this applies to most players on tour. Do you think it's acceptable for a child to have to focus on a career so young. It's not really healthy to exercise excessively. Is it really worth the money? People forget that for every kid that makes it theres another thousand that don't. I hate the way some tennis players don't get to do normal things as a child. They all seem to get whisked of to Florida or a tennis academy somewhere to practise and practise and practise and practise. It's not fair.
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post #2 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 09:44 PM
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You make an excellent point and I'm sure there are many pro's and cons to the sacrifices one has to make along the way. For instance, I always maintained that Martina Hingis was "deprived" out of a normal childhood because of her mother's obsessive desire to make her a champion which she did .....and as a result Martina had 5 Grand Slam's in her pocket at age 17 plus she also won 9 G.S. doubles titles. Martina was a exceptional child prodigy but she has been asked that same question many times and she said she has no regrets and as far as she's concerned had a "happy" childhood even though it wasn't normal....she loved what she was doing and was successful doing it!!



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post #3 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 09:45 PM
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Great question !
After my daughter saw some Venus and Serena tapes that I'd acquired, she suddenly became inspired and wanted to play. She was 5 yrs old. I signed her up with a coach and she took lessons for two years. The coach said that she had enormous ability and potential, and should continue. He said that she could "...smack the hell out of the ball." And that she picked up the techniques really fast and had great focus for someone so young. But I stopped her lessons because as her father, I had to decide whether academics or sports was more important. I decided on academics. So she's taking Kunk-Fu classes now and is excelling there. She's also classroom representative right now, tops in her 3rd grade class, and is only 8 years old trying to write books. I'm not bragging. Just so doggone proud of her.

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post #4 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 11:02 PM
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I think as long as the child is happy it doesn't matter if they have a 'typical' childhood. If they desire to be the best tennis player in the world, I think they have to work or it & it should ultimately be the child's decision.
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post #5 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 11:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cartmancop
I think as long as the child is happy it doesn't matter if they have a 'typical' childhood. If they desire to be the best tennis player in the world, I think they have to work or it & it should ultimately be the child's decision.
I'm agree with you on that.

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post #6 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 20th, 2004, 11:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cartmancop
I think as long as the child is happy it doesn't matter if they have a 'typical' childhood. If they desire to be the best tennis player in the world, I think they have to work or it & it should ultimately be the child's decision.
ditto
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post #7 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 02:20 AM
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I really wish for my daughter to play tennis. I don't want her to be unhappy but I think you can do both play tennis and be a normal child. I have a long time until I have to worry about that but I guess I can dream.

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post #8 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 02:28 AM
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i don't have children, but they will be introduced to tennis. the level at which they pursue tennis will be up to them. if they're having fun and want to be great and put the time in, i'll support that for sure. i don't see myself being a pushy parent, but i would love to see my children enjoying tennis as much as i have. but im a staunch believer that the best tennis can be found in the parks. you see people laughing there with their kids and family... that would be fine with me.
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post #9 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 11:48 AM
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no.

i'd do it the Richard Williams way. many props to him for the way he raised Venus and Serena.
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post #10 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 02:33 PM
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ReeVeeDynasty, it sounds like your daughter is determined to succeed at everything she does no matter what be it academics or sport. Be very proud of her. Children who are born with that type of drive and tenacity are a very rare breed. All you really need to do is encourage her all the way in whatever she loves doing best. (Give tennis another try. )

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post #11 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 02:34 PM
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If its what she really wanted to do then yes...but you know in the UK its a tough desicion espeically since schools dont rerally support it.

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post #12 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SJW
no.

i'd do it the Richard Williams way. many props to him for the way he raised Venus and Serena.
So you think Venus and Serena weren't made to practice all day, every day?
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post #13 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoDominique
So you think Venus and Serena weren't made to practice all day, every day?
exactly! there is a huge difference between losing your childhood and having had a different childhood than most of your peers. most successful tennis players enjoyed a different childgood. that does not mean that there were all unhappy. the Mary Pierce experience is not the norm for most of IMOthese girls.

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post #14 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReeVeeDynasty
Great question !
After my daughter saw some Venus and Serena tapes that I'd acquired, she suddenly became inspired and wanted to play. She was 5 yrs old. I signed her up with a coach and she took lessons for two years. The coach said that she had enormous ability and potential, and should continue. He said that she could "...smack the hell out of the ball." And that she picked up the techniques really fast and had great focus for someone so young. But I stopped her lessons because as her father, I had to decide whether academics or sports was more important. I decided on academics. So she's taking Kunk-Fu classes now and is excelling there. She's also classroom representative right now, tops in her 3rd grade class, and is only 8 years old trying to write books. I'm not bragging. Just so doggone proud of her.

Intelligent girl obviously.
Are you really sure that you are her father .... ?

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post #15 of 46 (permalink) Old Nov 21st, 2004, 05:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedFilaJ-Cap#1
I really wish for my daughter to play tennis. I don't want her to be unhappy but I think you can do both play tennis and be a normal child. I have a long time until I have to worry about that but I guess I can dream.
It is a point of view. If you play tennis for pleasure and not professional you will not lose so many time in your childhood. But if you want to play the wta tour with 16 or 17 years like all these Sharapova, Golvin, Safina, Vaidisova and many others, it is very stressy. You have to start seriuosly in a tennis school with many hours of practicing all day and apart from that learn some school subjects like English (for me I consider it as a foreign language ) or Mathematics and than there is not a lot of freetime.

It is hard for young girls of 12 or 13 to start that hard. For example Maria Sharapova was seperated from her parents (in Russia) when she was in an American tennis school for so many years. Can you imagine that!

I really admiring players who make such a difficult way to become a tennis player. I'm not against these decisions but it is a really hard life and you have to surrender on a lot of things.
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