Whatever happened to HOLLY PARKINSON and ANNIE MILLER ?? - TennisForum.com
 
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy Whatever happened to HOLLY PARKINSON and ANNIE MILLER ??

I can't find anything on ANNIE MILLER and the last but of tennis news on HOLLY i can find is when she played mixed doubles with Andy Roddick on WORLD TEAM TENNIS in 2002 ???

WHAT HAPPENED!!!!!
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:14 PM Thread Starter
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Ok... now i found out what happened to Holly...

Circuit Player of the Week

5/28/02 6:14 PM
Holly Parkinson (Jamie Squire/Allsport)
HOLLY PARKINSON
Birthdate: Feb. 10, 1979
Birthplace: Bethesda, Md.
Resides: Provo, Utah
Height: 5’ 5”
Weight: 115 lbs.
Plays: Right-handed; two-handed backhand

Parkinson, 23, has had an impressive tennis career, from the pros all the way down to juniors. She had her best year on the Sanex WTA Tour in 2000, when she made her French Open and Wimbledon debuts, advanced to the quarterfinals in Philadelphia as a qualifier, and reached a career-high ranking of 85th in the world. On the USTA Professional Circuit, she was a semifinalist at the $75,000 event in Albuquerque, N.M., last year, and a semifinalist at the $75,000 event in Kirkland, Wash., and a quarterfinalist at the $50,000 event in Albuquerque in 2000. At the junior level, she won four USTA National junior titles and was a member of the 1995 U.S. National Team.


Parkinson is going to be playing professional tennis for the last time this summer. She will be getting married next month and is slated to become the assistant tennis coach at Brigham Young University in August.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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Holly Parkinson-Hasler could be playing on the women's tennis pro tour, but instead she calls BYU her home.
In her first official season of assistant coaching, Parkinson-Hasler brings a lot to the court.

Consistently ranked in the top 100 of the Women's Tennis Association, Parkinson-Hasler achieved her highest ranking of 83 in 2000.


I was struggling with injuries in the fourth year," she said. "I was enjoying competing, but not the lifestyle. I was traveling 30 weeks a year, was burnt out and decided to take a break."

It was during this break that Parkinson-Hasler turned to coaching.

"I volunteered last season for fun because I was bored and still deciding what I wanted to do," she said.

That was from last summer ...she is still only 25! I really hope she made the right desicion!
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:18 PM
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yes, Holly accepted a job as a tennis coach

Annie left a few years ago, because she was sick of playing pro tennis - I remember reading that she found herself being very miserable all of the time on the tour because she just couldn't handle the up's and down's of winning and losing. I am sure it takes its toll on some people very quickly. That combined with veing away from home, family, friends etc., I'm surprised more people don't end up leaving sooner but I guess it just depends on your passion for the competitiveness.

She made a brief comeback a couple of years ago during the summer hardcourt season but since then hasn't been around again. It's a shame really, because she was a good player and when she decided to leave she was finally starting to make her way up the rankings (got up to around 40ish or so I think).

"Religion has actually convinced people that there is an invisible man living in the sky who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do. Any if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever 'til the end of time!

But he loves you."

George Carlin
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:21 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy H
yes, Holly accepted a job as a tennis coach

Annie left a few years ago, because she was sick of playing pro tennis - I remember reading that she found herself being very miserable all of the time on the tour because she just couldn't handle the up's and down's of winning and losing. I am sure it takes its toll on some people very quickly. That combined with veing away from home, family, friends etc., I'm surprised more people don't end up leaving sooner but I guess it just depends on your passion for the competitiveness.

She made a brief comeback a couple of years ago during the summer hardcourt season but since then hasn't been around again. It's a shame really, because she was a good player and when she decided to leave she was finally starting to make her way up the rankings (got up to around 40ish or so I think).
Thanks for the INFO about ANNIE! It really puts AMY FRAZIERS career in perspective..she has never been a top 10 player..but almost always in the top 50 plyer and sometimes even going down to the challengers when she feels its right...17 years is a LONG time on the WTA tour
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:25 PM
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here's an article that i found online


BY MARK WINTERS



Former pro Annie Miller left behind a Top 50 ranking for the pursuit of education.


Annie Miller is well into her freshman year at the University of Michigan. Ordinarily, information like that is only newsworthy among a student's relatives, but in Miller's case the announcement deserves a banner headline. The reason is simple: She quit tennis to be at school. Rather than prepare for WTA events in places like Japan, Indonesia and Germany, Miller, 22, has picked up the books full-time, shelving her game and her No. 41 world ranking.

The move, coming after playing tennis for three years, was spurred by several factors. Reality was one. "With no contracts and with paying my own expenses, I'm only making a little money," admits the native of Midland, Mich., who played on the USTA National Team from 1990 to 1993. "I don't want to sound hyper-critical, but I think most of the women at my level have to watch their money, (because) we make half of what the men make."

But even more important for Miller is the issue of being content with life on the tour. "I have had a battle within myself, deciding if tennis is going to make me happy in the next five to seven years," she says. "The greatest thing in the world is that (last year's French Open finalists) Carlos Moya and Alex Corretja went out to dinner (with each other) before that match. The guys seem to be able to separate the on-court and off-court stuff. A lot of the girls are friends with each other, but the way I feel -- and maybe I just take everything too personally -- is they have difficulty going on court and being competitive and then coming off and becoming friendly."

Budget problems and tour diplomacy are issues faced by almost all the pros but the difficulty is magnified when they're away from home and alone, when their emotional supports are thousands of miles away every week. "Top players can take their core unit of support with them," Miller says. "That's huge -- it's great to be able to have that stability with you. Without it, you can be consumed by little things."

Miller's father, Michael, is a doctor, one brother, John, is an attorney and another brother, David, is a fourth-year medical student, so it's easy to understand why life for Miller needs to consist of more than sport. "In my senior year of high school I was waffling about turning pro," she says. "Even when I started playing, there was some doubt always lingering. I was raised in a family where education is important. Tennis wasn't supposed to be my only way out."

Miller knows that many people don't grasp why she's refocused her life away from a relatively successful tennis career. "I don't tell people I was a professional player," she says, "but when they find out, they say, `You're crazy! Why did you quit?' Their reaction isn't surprising -- they don't understand what it's like to play week after week. All they see is a big tournament or a Grand Slam on network television."

Miller last played competitively at the 1998 US Open, where she lost in the third-round to Monica Seles 6-3, 6-3. Then she signed a one-year lease for an apartment in Ann Arbor, Mich., and moved in to start a new life. Her new opponents became classes in Spanish, statistics, and geography. "It's definitely different, but I'm enjoying it," she says. "For a person who played professional tennis, and (for whom tennis) came easy, it's a grind having to do homework and study."

But is she done with professional tennis forever?

"I know everyone says, `She's going to play again,'" Miller says. "For me, going to college has more to do with the rest of my life. The girls on the tour say I'm going through a phase. Tennis has been one of the most important things in my life, so of course I miss hitting a ball. But it's nice to get up in the morning, not put on tennis clothes, and walk on campus being one of the masses. I'm liking this."

"Religion has actually convinced people that there is an invisible man living in the sky who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do. Any if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever 'til the end of time!

But he loves you."

George Carlin
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy H







here's an article that i found online


BY MARK WINTERS



Former pro Annie Miller left behind a Top 50 ranking for the pursuit of education.


Annie Miller is well into her freshman year at the University of Michigan. Ordinarily, information like that is only newsworthy among a student's relatives, but in Miller's case the announcement deserves a banner headline. The reason is simple: She quit tennis to be at school. Rather than prepare for WTA events in places like Japan, Indonesia and Germany, Miller, 22, has picked up the books full-time, shelving her game and her No. 41 world ranking.

The move, coming after playing tennis for three years, was spurred by several factors. Reality was one. "With no contracts and with paying my own expenses, I'm only making a little money," admits the native of Midland, Mich., who played on the USTA National Team from 1990 to 1993. "I don't want to sound hyper-critical, but I think most of the women at my level have to watch their money, (because) we make half of what the men make."

But even more important for Miller is the issue of being content with life on the tour. "I have had a battle within myself, deciding if tennis is going to make me happy in the next five to seven years," she says. "The greatest thing in the world is that (last year's French Open finalists) Carlos Moya and Alex Corretja went out to dinner (with each other) before that match. The guys seem to be able to separate the on-court and off-court stuff. A lot of the girls are friends with each other, but the way I feel -- and maybe I just take everything too personally -- is they have difficulty going on court and being competitive and then coming off and becoming friendly."

Budget problems and tour diplomacy are issues faced by almost all the pros but the difficulty is magnified when they're away from home and alone, when their emotional supports are thousands of miles away every week. "Top players can take their core unit of support with them," Miller says. "That's huge -- it's great to be able to have that stability with you. Without it, you can be consumed by little things."

Miller's father, Michael, is a doctor, one brother, John, is an attorney and another brother, David, is a fourth-year medical student, so it's easy to understand why life for Miller needs to consist of more than sport. "In my senior year of high school I was waffling about turning pro," she says. "Even when I started playing, there was some doubt always lingering. I was raised in a family where education is important. Tennis wasn't supposed to be my only way out."

Miller knows that many people don't grasp why she's refocused her life away from a relatively successful tennis career. "I don't tell people I was a professional player," she says, "but when they find out, they say, `You're crazy! Why did you quit?' Their reaction isn't surprising -- they don't understand what it's like to play week after week. All they see is a big tournament or a Grand Slam on network television."

Miller last played competitively at the 1998 US Open, where she lost in the third-round to Monica Seles 6-3, 6-3. Then she signed a one-year lease for an apartment in Ann Arbor, Mich., and moved in to start a new life. Her new opponents became classes in Spanish, statistics, and geography. "It's definitely different, but I'm enjoying it," she says. "For a person who played professional tennis, and (for whom tennis) came easy, it's a grind having to do homework and study."

But is she done with professional tennis forever?

"I know everyone says, `She's going to play again,'" Miller says. "For me, going to college has more to do with the rest of my life. The girls on the tour say I'm going through a phase. Tennis has been one of the most important things in my life, so of course I miss hitting a ball. But it's nice to get up in the morning, not put on tennis clothes, and walk on campus being one of the masses. I'm liking this."
Thanks so much!
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraziersFan
Thanks so much!
no prob

"Religion has actually convinced people that there is an invisible man living in the sky who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do. Any if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever 'til the end of time!

But he loves you."

George Carlin
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:50 PM
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Reading Annie's story makes you realize how individual tennis really is. For her, Holly and Annabel Ellwood, tennis just wasn't an option anymore.

Yet you see a players like Silvia Farina-Elia and Tzipora Obziler who decided they still had the desire and ended up becoming more successful later in their careers.

Just proves that when it comes to at least tennis, everyone is different. Some like Amy Frazier love seeing the world and others like Kimiko Date just don't like being away from home for so long.

And since Annie has played tennis since that article, you never know there might be someone else we see pop back up out of the blue.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 07:52 PM
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Holly Parkinson is definitely coaching tennis right now, I saw her with a student a few months back.

*~Elena Dementieva~*


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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old May 16th, 2004, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakeev
Reading Annie's story makes you realize how individual tennis really is. For her, Holly and Annabel Ellwood, tennis just wasn't an option anymore.

Yet you see a players like Silvia Farina-Elia and Tzipora Obziler who decided they still had the desire and ended up becoming more successful later in their careers.

Just proves that when it comes to at least tennis, everyone is different. Some like Amy Frazier love seeing the world and others like Kimiko Date just don't like being away from home for so long.

And since Annie has played tennis since that article, you never know there might be someone else we see pop back up out of the blue.
Yes it does... its makes the stories of Silvia Farinas abd Fraziers so amazuing and fun to follow and watch... and Jill Craybas ( to a lesser extent as this point..but still amazing that she is hitting her peak and about ready to break into the top 50 for the first time at age 29 ...ALMOST 30!) .
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old May 17th, 2004, 02:16 PM
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Thanks for the info guys.

I was wondering how Holly and Annie were doing.
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old May 19th, 2004, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraziersFan
Yes it does... its makes the stories of Silvia Farinas abd Fraziers so amazuing and fun to follow and watch... and Jill Craybas ( to a lesser extent as this point..but still amazing that she is hitting her peak and about ready to break into the top 50 for the first time at age 29 ...ALMOST 30!) .
Another player that has just reappeared is Ann Mall. She is about 29 herself and is yet another junior star who never really made it.

She made it to the quarters of her last 10k satellite event and now is in the main draw of El Paso.

I think her one claim to fame is that 10 years ago she beat teenager Paola Saurez in a WTA event (I think L.A.)

So let's see how she does this year.
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